Literature Database on Gender in Subsahara Africa

Literature regarding Zimbabwe

agriculture ecology rural development climate changearts and cultureeconomy - formal and informal employment
economy - Householdseconomy - markets and traderseconomy - pastoralism
education schooling and tertiary educationhealth - fgc fgmhealth - HIV AIDS and gender
health - reproduction and fertilityhealth history colonialism and pre-colonial history
Literature media politics - wars violent conflicts
politics Religion - Christianity Religion - Islam
Religion - traditional rituals and spirit mediumshipRights - human rights violations gender based violence Rights - Women Human Rights and legal system
society - families marriagessociety - homosexuality / sexual minorities society - masculinities
society - migration and urbanisationsociety - women's organisations

agriculture ecology rural development climate change

Adams, Jennifer (1991): Female wage labour in rural Zimbabwe, in: World Development, vol. 19, no. 2/3, pp.163-177.[1273]

Amanor-Wilks, Dede (1996): Invisible hands: Women in Zimbabwe’s commercial farm sector, in: Southern African Feminist Review, vol. 2, no. 1, pp.37-57.[1274]

Anderson, Carina (1990): Mobilization and education of women farmers in Zimbabwe, A study of women’s participation programme, 1988-1990, organized by National Farmers Association of Zimbabwe, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, International Rural Development Centre, Working Paper 152, Uppsala.[1275]

Ansell, Nicola (2002): Secondary education reform in Lesotho and Zimbabwe and the needs of rural girls, Pronouncements, policy and practice, in: Comparative Education, vol. 38, no. 1, pp.91-112.[1276]

Bwerinofa, Patricia (1985): Fambirayi Mberi and Kusimudzira Zimbabwe co-operatives for female ex-combatants, in: Muntemba, Shimwaayi (ed.): Rural development and women: Lessons from the field, vol. I, ILO Publications, Geneva, pp.85-95.[1277]

Carr, Marilyn (1991): Zimbabwe, in: Carr, Marilyn: Women and food security, The experiences of SADAC, IT-Publications, London, pp.71-90.[1278]

Cheater, Angela (1981): Women and their participation in commercial agricultural production: The case of medium-scale freehold in Zimbabwe, in: Development and Change, vol. 12, pp.349-377.[1279]

Chenaux-Repond, Maia (1996): Die Umsiedlung hat mein Leben verändert, Die Landrechte von Frauen in Zimbabwe, in: Studer, A. et. al. (eds.): Land und Macht, die Landfrage im südlichen Afrika, Basel, pp.93-116.[1280]

Chidzongo, Mavis (1992): The situation of women in agriculture in the communal areas of Zimbabwe, in: Mukandwire, Richard / Madlosa, Khabele (eds.): Food policy and agriculture in Southern Africa, SAPES Trust Publications, Harare, pp.181-208.[1281]

Chikovore, Jeremiah / Nystrom, Lennarth et al. (2003): Denial and violence, Paradoxes in men’s perspectives on premarital sex and pregnancy in rural Zimbabwe, in: African Sociological Review, vol. 7, no. 1, pp.53-72.[1282]

Chikuni, Ordias / Polder, Anuschka (2003): Human exposure to airborne pesticide pollutants, in: Jacobs, Miriam / Dinham, Barbara (eds.): Silent invaders, Pesticides, livelihoods and women’s health, Zed Books, London, pp.127-133.[1283]

Chimedza, Ruvimbo (1985): Saving Clubs: The Mobilisation of rural finances in Zimbabwe, in: Muntemba, Shimwaayi (ed.): Rural development and women: Lessons from the field, vol. I, ILO-Publications, Geneva, pp.161-174.[1284]

Chingozho, Dorris (2002): Intermediate means of transport and gender relations, Zimbabwe, in: Fernando, Priyanthi / Porter, Gina (eds.): Balancing the load, Women, gender and transport, Zed Books, London, pp.25-36.[1285]

Chitsike, Colletah (2000): Culture as a barrier to rural women’s entrepreneurship, Experience from Zimbabwe, in: Gender and Development, vol. 8, no. 1, pp.71-77.[1286]

Cleaver, Frances (2000): Analysing gender roles in community natural resource management, Negotiation, life courses and social inclusion, in: Bulletin of the Institute of Development Studies, vol. 31, no. 2, pp.60-67.[1287]

Cowan, Frances / Pascoe, Sophie / Langhaug, Lisa (2008): The Regai Dzive Shiri Project, A cluster randomised controlled trial to determine the effectiveness of a multi-component community-based HIV-prevention intervention for rural youth in Zimbabwe, in: Tropical Medicine and International Health, vol. 13, no. 10, pp.1235-1244.[1288]

Debrabandere, Regine / Desmet, Arnout (1998): Brides have a price: Gender dimensions of objective-oriented project planning in Zimbabwe, in: Guijt, Irene / Shah, Meera Kaul (eds.): The myths of community, Gender issues in participatory development, IT Publications, London, pp.100-109.[1289]

Doran, J. (1994): Transportation by women, and their access to animal-drawn carts in Zimbabwe, in: Starkey, Paul / Mwenya, Emmanuel (eds.): Improving animal traction technology, CTA Publications, Wageningen, pp.15-21.[1290]

Folta, Jeanette / Deck, Edith (1987): Elderly black widows in rural Zimbabwe, in: Journal of Cross-Cultural Gerontology, vol. 2, pp.321-342.[1291]

Fortmann, Louise (1996): Gendered knowledge: Rights and space in two Zimbabwean villages, in: Rocheleau, Dianne / Thomas-Slayter, Barbara / Wangari, Ester (eds.): Feminist political ecology, Global issues and local experiences, Routledge Publications, London, pp.211-223.[1292]

Fortmann, Louise / Antinori, Camille / Nabane, Nontokozo (1997): Fruits of their labours: Gender, property rights, and tree planting in two Zimbabwean villages, in: Rural Sociology, vol. 62, no. 3, pp.295-314.[1293]

Francis-Chizororo, Monica (2010): Gowing up without parents, Socialisation and gender relations in orphaned-child-headed households in rural Zimbabwe, in: Journal of Southern African Studies, vol. 36, no. 3, pp. 711-727.[1294]

Gaidzanwa, R.B. (1995): Land and the economic empowerment of women, A gendered analysis, in: Southern African Feminist Review (SAFERE), vol. 1, no. 1, pp.1-12.[1295]

Gaidzanwa, R.B. (1997): Non-farm activities and gender in Zimbabwe, in: Bryceson, Deborah Fahy / Jamal, Vali (eds.): Farewell to farms, De-Agrarisation and employment in Africa, African Studies Centre Leiden, Research Series, 10, Ashgate Publishers, Aldershot, pp.157-166.[1296]

Gaidzanwa, R.B. (1998): Women’s land rights in Zimbabwe, An overview, Department of Rural and Urban Planning, University of Zimbabwe, Harare.[1297]

Goebel, Allison (1999): „Here it is our land, the two of us“: Women, men and land in a Zimbabwean resettlement area, in: Journal of Contemporary African Studies, vol. 17, no. 1, pp.75-96.[1298]

Goebel, Allison (2002): ‘Men these days, they are the problem’, Husband-taming herbs and gender wars in rural Zimbabwe, in: Canadian Journal of African Studies, vol. 36, no. 3, pp.460-489[1299]

Goebel, Allison (2005): Gender and land reform, The Zimbabwe experience, McGill-Queens University Press, Montreal.[1300]

Goebel, Allison (2007): “We are working for nothing”, Livelihoods and gender relations in rural Zimbabwe, 2000-2006, in: Canadian Journal of African Studies, vol. 41, no. 2, pp.226-256.[1301]

Gwebu, Thando (2006): Intra-rural fertility determinants in Zimbabwe, A path analysis, in: African Population Studies, vol. 21, no. 1, pp.71-91.[1302]

Hagmann, Jürgen / Chuma, Edward / Gundani, Oliver (1996): Acknowledging the role of gender in agricultural research and extension, A project experience from Zimbabwe, Paper submitted to GTZ, Section 04, Eschborn. [1303]

Hebinck, Paul / Bourdillon, Michael (eds. (2001): Women, men and work, Rural livelihoods in south-eastern Zimbabawe, Weaver Press, Harare.[1304]

Hoogeveen, Hans et al. (2003): On the timing of marriage, Cattle and weather shocks in rural Zimbabwe, World Bank Publications, Washington D.C.[1305]

Izumi, Kaori (1999): Liberalisation, gender, and the land question in sub-Saharan Africa, in: Gender and Development, vol. 7, no. 3, pp.9-18.[1306]

Jacobs, Susie (1984): Women and land resettlement in Zimbabwe, in: Review of African Political Economy, vol. 27/28, pp.33-50.[1307]

Jacobs, Susie (1989): State, class, and gendered models of land resettlement, in: Parpart, Jane / Staudt, Kathleen (eds.): Women and state in Africa, Lynne Rienner Publications, Boulder, pp.161-184.[1308]

Jacobs, Susie (1991): Changing gender relations in Zimbabwe: The case of individual family resettlement areas, in: Elson, Diane (ed.): Male bias in development process, Contemporary issues in development studies, Manchester University Press, Manchester, pp.51-82.[1309]

Jacobs, Susie (1996): Structures and processes: Land, families and gender relations, in: Gender and Development, vol. 4, no. 2, pp.35-42.[1310]

Kakaru, Doris / Paradza, Gaynor (2007): Reflections on the use of life history methods in reseraching rural women, Field experience from Uganda and Zimbabwe, in: Gender and Development, vol. 15, issue 2, pp.287-297.[1311]

Kesby, Mike (1999): Locating and dislocating gender in rural Zimbabwe: The making of space and the texturing of bodies, in: Gender, Place and Culture, vol. 6, no. 1, pp.27-47.[1312]

Loewenson, René (1981): Harvests of disease, Women at work on Zimbabwean plantations, in: Meredeth, Trushen (ed.): Women and health in Africa, Africa World Press, Trenton, pp.37-49.[1313]

Luo-Mbizvo, Carmel (2001): The role of women in small-scale bread, brick and beer-industries in rural Zimbabwe, ZERO Publications, Working Paper, no. 20, Harare.[1314]

Made, Pat (2000): A field of her own, Women and land rights in Zimbabwe, in: Mirsky, Judith / Radlett, Marty (eds.): No paradise yet, The world’s women face the new century, Zed Books, London, pp.81-100.[1315]

Mathole, Thubelihle, Lindmark, Gunilla / Maina, Beth (2006): Knowing but not knowing, Providing maternity care in the context of HIV/AIDS in rural Zimbabwe, in: African Journal of AIDS Research, vol. 5, no. 2, pp.133-139.[1316]

Maxwell, Mudhara / Hildebrand, Peter / Gladwin, Christina (2002): Gender-sensitive LP models in soil fertility research for smallholder farmers, Researching de-jure female headed households in Zimbabwe, in: African Studies Quarterly, vol. 6, no. 1, pp.1-12.[1318]

Mazur, Robert / Mhloyi, Marvellous (1994): Women’s work and fertility in Zimbabwe: Engendering development with change, in: Adepoju, Aderanti / Oppong, Christine (eds.): Gender, work and population in Sub-Saharan Africa, James Currey Press, Oxford, pp.132-156.[1317]

Mehretu, Assefa / Mutambirwa, Chris (1992): Gender differences in time and energy costs of distance for regular domestic chores in rural Zimbabwe: in: World Development, vol. 20, no. 11, pp.1675-1683.[1319]

Moyo, Sam (1995): A gendered perspective of the land, in: Southern African Feminist Review, vol. 1, no. 1, pp.13-31.[1320]

Moyo, Sam / Page, Helen (1991): A review of class and gender as basis of agricultural extension services in Zimbabwe’s communal areas, Zimbabwe Institute of Development Studies, Discussion Paper, no. 16, University of Zimbabwe, Harare.[1321]

Muchena, Olivia (1994): The changing perceptions of women in agriculture, in: Pukuni, Mandivamba / Eicher, Karl (eds.): Zimbabwe’s agricultural revolution, University of Zimbabwe Press, Harare, pp.348-360.[1322]

Mudege, Netsayi (2008): Gender roles in agricultural knowledge in a land resettlement context, The case of Mupfurudzi, Zimbabwe, in: Development Southern Africa, vol. 25, no. 4, pp.455-468.[1323]

Mungwini, Pascah (2007): ‘Forward to the past’, Dilemmas of rural women’s empowerment in Zimbabwe, in: African Sociological Review, vol. 11, no. 2, pp.124-133.[1324]

Mutopa, Patience (2011): Women’s struggle to access and control land and livelihoods after fast track reform in Mwenzi District, Zimbabwe, in: Journal of Peasant Studies, vol. 38, no. 5, pp.1021-1046.[1327]

Muylwijk, Joke (1989): Gender ideology and differences in access to animal draught power for women farmers in Malawi and Zimbabwe, in: Agrarian Questions, Proceedings, vol. 4, Wageningen Agricultural University, Wageningen, pp.19-36.[1325]

Muylwijk, Joke / Smetsers, Maria (1996): Gender and agricultural engineering in Sub-Saharan Africa, A case study in Zimbabwe, in: Muylwijk, Joke / Smetsers, Maria: Gender and agricultural engineering, Department of Gender Studies in Agriculture and The Agricultural Engineering Branch of the FAO, AGSE Occasional Paper, Wageningen, pp.4-18.[1326]

Nabane, Nontokozo / Matzke, Gordon (1997): A gender-sensitive analysis of a community-based wildlife utilization initiative in Zimbabwe’s Zambezi Valley, in: Society and Natural Resources, vol. 10, pp.519-535.[1328]

Page, Sam (2003): Rural mothers with HIV, Eliminating pesticide exposure, in: Jacobs, Miriam / Dinham, Barbara (eds.): Silent invaders, Pesticides, livelihoods and women’s health, Zed Books, London, pp.48-57.[1329]

Parkhurst, Donna (1991): Constraints and incentives in 'successful' Zimbabwean peasant agriculture: The interaction between gender and class, in: Journal of Southern African Studies, vol. 17, no. 4, pp.611-632.[1330]

Parkhurst, Donna / Jacobs, Susie (1988): Land tenure, gender relations, and agricultural production: The case of Zimbabwe's peasantry, in: Davison, Jean (ed.): Agriculture, women, and land, The African experience, Westview Press, Boulder, pp.202-227.[1331]

Ranchod-Nilsson, Sita (1996): „Educating Eve“: The women’s club movement and political consciousness among rural African women, in: Tranberg Hansen, Karen (ed.): African encounters with domesticity, Rutgers University Press, New Brunswick, pp.195-217.[1332]

Russie, Annalise (2000): Paths are made by walking, Die Frauen in Zimbabwe zwischen traditionellem und modernem Recht, in: Jong, Willemijn / Move, Illona / Roth, Claudia (Hrsg.): Bilder und Realitäten der Geschlechter, Argonaut Verlag, Zürich, pp.199-217.[1333]

Sachkonye, L.M. (1997): Female workers in agribusiness in Zimbabwe, Gender Issues Research Report Series no. 3, OSSREA, Addis Abeba.[1334]

Schmidt, Elizabeth (1987): Women’s workload and social change: The making of a peasant in the Goromonzi district of Southern Rhodesia, 1898-1934, WID, Working Paper, no. 151, Michigan State University, East Lansing.[1340]

Schmidt, Elizabeth (1988): Farmers, hunters, and gold-washers: A re-evaluation of women's roles in pre-colonial and colonial Zimbabwe, in: African Economic History, vol. 17, pp.45-80.[1341]

Schmidt, Elizabeth (1992): Peasants, traders and wives, Shona women in the history of Zimbabwe, 1870-1939, James Curry Publishers, London. [1342]

Schäfer, Rita (1998): Anbauinnovationen und Wissenskommunikation - zur Bedeutung von Geschlechteraspekten und gesellschaftlichen Veränderungen in Zimbabwe, in: Der Tropenlandwirt, 99. Jg., pp.17-30.[1335]

Schäfer, Rita (1998): Guter Rat ist wie die Glut des Feuers, Der Wandel der Anbaukenntnisse, Wissenskommunikation und Geschlechterverhältnisse der Shona in Zimbabwe, Centaurus Verlag, Pfaffenweiler.[1336]

Schäfer, Rita (1998): Gender und Migration im südlichen Afrika – das Fallbeispiel Zimbabwe, in: Journal für Entwicklungspolitik, vol. 24, no. 3, pp.231-243.[1337]

Schäfer, Rita (1999): Gender Aspekte des lokalen Wissens in Zimbabwe, in: Teherani-Krönner, Parto / Hoffmann-Altmann, Uta / Schultz, Ulrike (Hg.): Frauen und nachhaltige ländliche Entwicklung, Centaurus Verlagsgesellschaft, Pfaffenweiler, pp.104-109.[1338]

Schäfer, Rita (2002): Hausgärten und Gartengruppen von Frauen in Zimbabwe und Sierra Leone, in: Meyer-Renschhausen, Elizabeth / Müller, Renate / Becker, Petra (Hg.): Die Gärten der Frauen, Centaurus Verlag, Herbolzheim, pp.99-110.[1339]

Sibanda, Ezilyn (1998): AIDS in Zimbabwe, Crisis in rural development, in: Southern African Feminist Review, vol. 3, no. 1, pp.33-42.[1343]

Smith, Sheila (1987): Zimbabwean women in co-operatives: Participation and sexual equality in four producers co-operatives, in: Journal of Social Development in Africa, vol. 2, pp.29-46.[1344]

Sylvester, Christine (1995): „Women“ in rural producer groups and the diverse politics of truths in Zimbabwe, in: Marchand, Marianne / Parpart, Jane (eds.): Feminism, postmodernism, development, Routledge Publishers, London, pp.182-205.[1345]

Vifhuizen, Carin (1996): Who feeds the children? Gender ideology and the practice of plot allocation in an irrigation scheme, in: Manzungu, Emmanuel / Zaag, Pieter van der (eds.): The practice of smallholder irrigation – Case studies from Zimbabwe, University of Zimbabwe Publications, Harare, pp.126-147.[1346]

Vifhuizen, Carin (2002): The people you live with, Gender identities and social practices, Beliefs and power in the livelihoods of Ndau women and men in a village with an irrigation scheme in Zimbabwe, Weaver Press, Harare.[1347]

Zimbabwe Women’s Resource Centre and Network (ZWRCN (1994): The gender dimension of access and land use rights in Zimbabwe, Evidence to the land commission, Harare.[1348]

Zimbabwe Women’s Resource Centre and Network (ZWRCN (1996): Women and land (special issue), in: Women Plus, vol. 1, no. 1, Harare.[1349]

Zimbabwe Women’s Resource Centre and Network (ZWRCN (2008): Situational analysis on the gender gaps in the agricultural sector in Zimbabwe, ZWRCN, Harare.[1350]

arts and culture

Boltz, Kerstin (2007): Women as artists in contemporary Zimbabwe, Bayreuth African Studies, Bayreuth.[1583]

Chitauro, Moreblessings / Dube, Caleb / Gunner, Liz (2001): Song, story and nation, Women as singers and actresses in Zimbabwe, in: Gunner, Liz (ed.): Politics and performance, Theatre, poetry and song in Southern Africa, Witwatersrand University Press, Johannesburg, pp. 111-138.[1584]

Dewey, William (1986): Shona male and female artistry, in: African Arts, vol. 19, no. 3, pp. 64-67.[1585]

Mugambi, Helen Nabasuta (2008): Zimbabwean feminist art and the politics of representation, in: Signs, Journal of Women in Culture and Society, vol. 33, no. 2, pp. 424-430.[1586]

Schäfer, Rita (2000): Zimbabwischen Steinbildhauerei aus der Perspektive der Geschlechterforschung - zum Leben und Werk zimbabwischer Steinbildhauerinnen, in: Tribus, Bd. 49, pp. 173-190.[1587]

Veit-Wild, Flora (2005): Tsitsi Dangarembga’s film “Kare Kare Zvako”, The survival of the butchered women, Review, in: Research in African Literatures, vol. 36, no. 2, pp. 132-138.[11576]

economy - formal and informal employment

Gibbon, Peter (1995): Strutural adjustment and the working poor in Zimbabwe, Studies, on labour, women informal sector sector workers and health, Publications of the Nordic Africa Institute, Uppsala.[1887]

Jassai, E.M. / Jirira K.O. (1989): Industrial development in Zimbabwe, The case of women in manufacturing activities, Consultancy reports no. 7, Zimbabwe Institute of Development Studies, Harare.[1888]

Kanji, Nazneen / Jazdowska, Niki (1994): Structural adjustment and women in Zimbabwe. In: Review of African Political Economy, no. 56, pp. 11-26.[1889]

Kanji, Nazneen / Jazdowska, Niki (1995): Gender, structural adjustment and employment in urban Zimbabwe, in: Third World Planning Review, vol. 17, no. 2, pp. 133- 152.[1890]

Lewis, Cindy (2004): Microfinance from the point of view of women with disabilities in Zambia and Zimbabwe, in: Sweetman, Caroline (ed.): Gender, development and diversity, Oxfam Publications, Oxford, pp. 28-39.[1891]

Osrim, Mary Johnson (1994): Women, work, and public policy: Structural adjustment and the informal sector in Zimbabwe, in: Kalipeni, Ezekiel (ed.): Population growth and environmental degradation in Southern Africa, Boulder, pp. 61-84.[1892]

Osrim, Mary Johnson (1996): The dynamics of modern development, Structural adjustment and women microentrepreneurs in Nigeria and Zimbabwe, in: Turpin, Jennifer (ed.): The gendered new world order, Routledge Publishers, London, pp. 127-146.[1893]

Osrim, Mary Johnson (1998): Negotiating identities during adjustment programs, Women micro-entrepreneurs in urban Zimbabwe, in: Spring, Anita / McDade, Barbara (eds.): African entrepreneurship, Theory and reality, University Press of Florida, Gainesville, pp. 277-297.[1894]

Osrim, Mary Johnson (2008): Creatively coping with crisis and globalization, Zimbabwean businesswomen in crocheting and kniting, in. Harley, A. (ed.): Women’s labour in the global economy, Speaking with multiple voices, Rutgers University Press, New Brunswick, pp. 134-157.[1895]

WLSA - Women and Law in Southern Africa (2021): Strengthening women’s voices in natural resource governance in Zimbabwe, Harare.[11625]

WLSA - Women and Law in Southern Africa (2021): Gender equality in the artisanal and small-scale mining ASM in the SADC region, Harare. [11626]

WLSA – Women and Law in Southern Africa (2019): Putting women at the Centre of Extractivism, A compendium on gender and extractives, Harare. [11627]

Women and Law in Southern Africa (2021): Women in extractive industry in Lesotho, Mozambique, Zambia and Zimbabwe, Harare.[11628]

economy - Households

Bell, Morang / Hotchkiss, Patricia (1991): Garden cultivation, conservation and household strategies in Zimbabwe, in: Africa, vol. 61, no. 2, pp. 202-211.[2027]

Dekker, Marleen / Hoogeveen, Hans (2002): Bride wealth and household security in rural Zimbabwe, in: Journal of African Economics, vol. 11, no. 1, pp. 114-145.[2028]

Folbre, Nancy (1986): Hearts and spades: Paradigms of household economics, in: World Development, vol. 14, no. 2, pp. 245-255.[2029]

Francis-Chizororo, Monica (2010): Gowing up without parents, Socialisation and gender relations in orphaned-child-headed households in rural Zimbabwe, in: Journal of Southern African Studies, vol. 36, no. 3, pp. 711-727.[2030]

Muzvidziwa, Victor (1997): Rural-urban linkages, Masvingo’s double-rooted female heads of households, in: Zambezia, vol. 24, no. 2, pp. 97-123.[2031]

Muzvidziwa, Victor (2000): Accessing housing, constraints and coping strategies by female-headed households in Masvingo, Zimbabwe, in: Review of Southern African Studies, vol. 4, no. 1, pp. 64-93.[2032]

Muzvidziwa, Victor (2002): Heads of households or simply breadwinner? A case study of married women in Masvingo, Zimbabwe, in: Le Beau, Debie / Gordon, Robert (eds.): Challenges for anthropology in the ‘African renaissance’, A Southern African perspective, University of Namibia Press, Windhoek, pp. 163-176.[2033]

Nyamukapa, Constance / Foster, Geoff / Gregson, Simon (2003): Orphans’ household circumstances and access to education in a maturing HIV epidemic in Eastern Zimbabwe, in: Journal of Social Development in Africa, vol. 18, no. 2, pp. 7-32.[2034]

Potts, Deborah (2000): Worker-peasants and farmer-housewives in Africa: The debate about ‘committed’ farmers, access to land and agricultural production, in: Journal of Southern African Studies, vol. 26, no.4, pp. 807-832.[2035]

Rowley, Chishamiso (2000): Challenges to effective maternal health care delivery, The case of traditional certified nurse midwives in Zimbabwe, in: Journal of Asian and African Studies, vol. 35, pp. 251-263.[2036]

economy - markets and traders

Barnes, Teresa (1992): The fight for control of African women’s mobility in colonial Zimbabwe, 1900-1939, in: Signs, Journal of Women in Culture and Society, vol. 17, pp. 586-608.[2239]

Barnes, Teresa (1999): We women work so hard, Gender, urbanisation and social reproduction in colonial Harare, Zimbabwe, 1930-1956, James Currey Publishers, London / Oxford.[2240]

Barnes, Teresa (2002): Virgin territory? Travel and migration by African women in twentieth-century southern Africa, in: Allman, Jean / Geiger, Susan / Musisi, Nakanyike (eds.): Women in colonial African histories, Indiana University Press, Bloomington, pp. 164-190.[2241]

Barnes, Terri / Win, Everjoyce (1992): To live a better life, An oral history of women in the city of Harare, 1930-1970, Baobab Books, Harare.[2242]

Burke, Timothy (1996): ‘Fork up and smile’: Marketing, colonial knowledge and the female subject in Zimbabwe, in: Gender and History, vol. 8, no. 3, pp. 440-456.[2243]

Burke, Timothy (1996): „Sunlight soap has changed my life“: Hygiene, commodification, and the body in colonial Zimbabwe, in: Hendickson, Hildi (ed.): Clothing and difference, Embodied identities in colonial and post-colonial Africa, Duke University Press, Durham, pp. 189-212.[2244]

Burke, Timothy (1996): Lifeboy men, lux women - Commodification, consumption and cleanliness in modern Zimbabwe, Duke University Press, Lanham.[2245]

Chamlee-Wright, Emily (2002): Savings and accumulation strategies of urban market women in Harare, Zimbabwe, in: Economic Development and Cultural Change, vol. 50, no. 4, pp. 979-1005.[2246]

Drakakis-Smith, D.W. (1984): The changing economic role of women in the urbanization process: A preliminary report from Zimbabwe, in: International Migration Review, vol. 17/18, no. 4, pp. 1278-1292.[2247]

Freidberg, S. (1996): Onions are my husband, Survival and accumulation by West African market women/cultivating customers, Market women in Harare, Zimbabwe, in: Economic Geography, vol. 72, no. 3, pp. 353-358.[2248]

Horn, Nancy (1994): Cultivating customers, Market women in Harare, Zimbabwe, Baobab Books, Boulder.[2249]

Horn, Nancy (1995): Women’s fresh produce marketing in Harare, Zimbabwe: Motivations for women’s participation and implications for development, in: House-Midamba, Bessie / Ekechi, Felix (eds.): African market women and economic power: The role of women in African economic development, Greenwood Press, Westport, pp. 141-156.[2250]

Horn, Nancy (1995): Market women, development, and structural adjustment in Harare, Zimbabwe, in: African Rural and Urban Studies, vol. 2, no. 1, pp. 17-42.[2251]

Horn, Nancy (1998): Overcoming challenges, Women micro-entrepreneurs in Harare, Zimbabwe, in: Spring, Anita / McDade, Barbara (eds.): African entrepreneurship, Theory and reality, University Press of Florida, Gainesville, pp. 128-146.[2252]

Mudimu, Godfrey (1996): Urban agricultural activities and women’s strategies in sustaining livelihoods in Harare, Zimbabwe, in: Singapore Journal of Tropical Geography, vol. 17, no. 2, pp. 179-194.[2253]

Mupedziswa, Rodreck / Gumbo, Perpetua (1998): Structural adjustment and women informal sector traders in Harare, Zimbabwe, The Nordic Africa Institute, Research Report, no. 106, Uppsala.[2254]

Mupedziswa, Rodreck / Gumbo, Perpetua (2001): Women informal traders in Harare and their struggle for survival in an environment of economic reforms, The Nordic Africa Institute, Research Report, no. 117, Uppsala.[2255]

Muzvidziwa, Victor (1997): Rural-urban linkages, Masvingo’s double-rooted female heads of households, in: Zambezia, vol. 24, no. 2, pp. 97-123.[2256]

Muzvidziwa, Victor (2001): Zimbabwe’s cross border women traders, Multiple identities and responses to new challenges, in: Journal of Contemporary African Studies, vol. 19, no. 1, pp. 67-89.[2257]

Nachudwa, Diana (1995): Women in micro-enterprises: The case of Mbare, Zimbabwe, in: Sithole-Fundire, Sylvia / Zhou, Agnes / Larsson, Anita / Schlyter, Ann (eds.): Gender research on urbanization, planning, housing and everyday life, Harare, 1995, pp. 135-144.[2258]

Osrim, Mary Johnson (1994): Women, work, and public policy: Structural adjustment and the informal sector in Zimbabwe, in: Kalipeni, Ezekiel (ed.): Population growth and environmental degradation in Southern Africa, Boulder, pp. 61-84.[2259]

Osrim, Mary Johnson (1995): Trade, economy, and family in urban Zimbabwe, in: House-Midamba, Bessie / Ekechi, Felix (eds.): African market women and economic power: The role of women in African economic development, Westport, pp. 157-176.[2260]

Osrim, Mary Johnson (1995): Trading in the midst of uncertainty: Market women, structural adjustment, and the prospects for development in Zimbabwe, in: African Rural and Urban Studies, vol. 2, no. 1, pp. 43-64.[2261]

Osrim, Mary Johnson (1996): Beyond simple survival: Women microentrepreneurs in Harare and Bulawayo, Zimbabwe, in: Sheldon, Kathleen (ed.): Courtyards, markets, city streets - Urban women in Africa, Boulder, pp. 213-240.[2262]

Osrim, Mary Johnson (1996): The dynamics of modern development, Structural adjustment and women microentrepreneurs in Nigeria and Zimbabwe, in: Turpin, Jennifer (ed.): The gendered new world order, Routledge Publishers, London, pp. 127-146.[2263]

Osrim, Mary Johnson (1998): Negotiating identities during adjustment programs, Women micro-entrepreneurs in urban Zimbabwe, in: Spring, Anita / McDade, Barbara (eds.): African entrepreneurship, Theory and reality, University Press of Florida, Gainesville, pp. 277-297.[2264]

Schlyter, Ann (1990): Women in Harare, Gender aspects of urban-rural interaction, in: Baker, Jonathan (ed.): Small town Africa, Publications of the Nordic Africa Institute, Uppsala, pp. 182-191.[2265]

Schmidt, Elizabeth (1990): Negotiated spaces and contexted terrain: Men, women and the law in colonial Zimbabwe, 1890-1939, in: Journal of Southern African Studies, vol. 16, no. 4, pp. 622-648.[2266]

Schmidt, Elizabeth (1992): Peasants, traders and wives - Shona women in the history of Zimbabwe, 1870-1939, London.[2267]

Schneider, Gabriele (1999): Women’s economy between subsistence and market production in Harare, Zimbabwe, Working Paper no. 315, Fakultät für Soziologie, Forschungsschwerpunkt Entwicklungssoziologie, Universität Bielefeld.[2268]

Schneider, Gabriele (2002): Haushalte, Netzwerke und Markt, Frauenarbeit für Sicherheit und Gemeinschaft in den Townships von Harare, in: Peripherie, Nr. 85/86, pp. 32-57.[2269]

economy - pastoralism

no entries to this combination of country and topic

education schooling and tertiary education

Chabaya, Owence / Gudhlanga, Enna (2013): Striving to achieve gender equality in education, A Zimbabwean experience, in: Zimbabwe Journal of Education Research, vol. 25, no. 1, pp.123-148.[2923]

Farisayi Zvogbo, Ellen (2015): Effectiveness of gender policies in the promotion of women leaders in universities, A case of Midlands State University, Zimbabwe, in: Zimbabwe Journal of Education Research, vol. 27, no. 1, pp. 15-32.[2924]

Gadsden, Fay (1993): Patriarchal attitudes, male control over and politics towards female education in Northern Rhodesia, 1924-1963, in: Zambia Journal of History, vol. 6/7, pp. 25-45.[2925]

Gaidzanwa, R. (1993): The politics of the body and the politics of control, An analysis of class, gender and cultural issues in student politics at the University of Zimbabwe, in: Zambezia, 20, pp. 15-33.[2926]

Gordon, Rosemary (1994): Education policy and gender in Zimbabwe, in: Gender and Education, vol. 6, no. 2, pp. 131-139.[2927]

Gordon, Rosemary (1996): Legislation and educational policy in Zimbabwe: The state and the reproduction of patriarchy, in: Gender and Education, vol. 8, no. 2, pp. 215-229.[2928]

Gordon, Rosemary (1998): ‚Girls cannot think as boys do’: Socialising children through the Zimbabwean school system, in: Gender and Development, vol. 6, no. 2, pp. 53-58.[2929]

Hausmann, Christine (1998): Non-formal education for women in Zimbabwe, Peter Lang Verlag, Frankfurt a.M.[2930]

Hausmann, Christine (2004): Bending tradition to the changing times, The use of video as an empowerment tool in nonformal adult education in Zimbabwe, Iko Verlag, Frankfurt a.M.[2931]

Kaziboni, Tabeth (2002): The impact of gender education on the attitudes of post-independence women in Zimbabwe, in: Zimbabwe Journal of Education Research, vol. 14, no. 2, pp. 179-195.[2932]

Mapolisa, Tichaona (2013): Female leadership dilemmas in primary schools, A case study in primary schools in Harare Province in Zimbabwe, in: Zimbabwe Journal of Educational Research, vol. 25, no. 2, pp. 261-276. [2933]

Marira, Chipo (1991): Gender issues in Zimbabwe’s two main English textbooks in the primary schools, in: Zimbabwe Journal of Educational Research, 3, pp. 108-124.[2934]

Morrow, Sean (1986): „No girl leaves school unmarried“: Mabel Shaw and the education of girls at Mbereshi, Northern Rhodesia, 1915-1940, in: International Journal of African Historical Studies, vol. 19, no. 4, pp. 601-636.[2935]

Mpofu, Stanley T. (1996): The women’s movement, adult education and globalization: Women’s agencies in Zimbabwe, in: Convergence, vol. 29, no. 4, pp. 58-67.[2936]

Muzingili, Taruvinga / Muchinako, G.A. (2016): Factors affecting school completion by th girl-child in Binga rural district, Zimbabwe, in: Zimbabwe Journal of Educational Research, vol. 28, no. 1, pp. 19-43.[2937]

Opare, James (1996): Boys and girls in science, Does the gender composition of the schools matter? In: Zimbabwe Journal of Education Research, vol. 8, no. 1, pp. 27-44.[2938]

Pattman, Rob (1999): The beer drinkers say I had a nice prostitute but the church goers talk about things spiritual, Learning to be a man at the teachers’ college in Zimbabwe, in: Morrell, Robert (ed.): Changing men in Southern Africa, Zed Books, London, pp. 225-238.[2939]

Schäfer, Rita (1997): Frauen- und Mädchenbildung in Zimbabwe, Möglichkeiten zum Empowerment, Freiburger Frauenstudien, 2. Jg., Heft 2, pp. 1-14.[2940]

Schäfer, Rita (1999): Frauenbildung und Frauenliteratur aus Zimbabwe, in: Afrika Bulletin, Nr. 96, pp. 10-11.[2941]

Schäfer, Rita (2000): Geschlechtergerechte Bildungsprogramme: Herausforderungen für die Bildungsforschung in Zimbabwe, in: Hahn, Hans-Peter / Spittler, Gerd (eds.): Afrika und die Globalisierung, Schriften der VAD Bd. 18, Lit-Verlag, Münster, pp.157-166.[2942]

Silverstone, Jessica (1993): Women, literacy and education, in: ZWRCN Discussion Paper, No. 7, Harare.[2943]

Summers, Carol (1996): ‘If you educate a native women’…, Debates over the schooling and education of girls and women in Southern Rhodesia, 1900-1934, in: History of Education Quarterly, vol. 36, no. 4, pp. 449-471.[2946]

Summers, Carol (1999): Mission boys, civilized men and marriage, Educated African men in the missions of Southern Rhodesia, 1920-1945, in: Journal of Religious History, vol. 23, no. 1, pp. 75-91.[2947]

Swainson, Nicola (1995): Redressing gender inequalities in education: A review of constraints and priorities in Malawi, Zambia and Zimbabwe, ODA, London.[2944]

Swainson, Nicola (2000): Knowledge and power: The design and implementation of gender policies in education in Malawi, Tanzania and Zimbabwe, in: International Journal of Educational Development, vol. 20.[2945]

Taringa, Beatrice (2014): Implications of the portrayal of women in Shonoa proverby for gender sensitive teaching and learning of ChiSona, in: Zimbabwe Journal of Educational Research, vol. 26, no. 3, pp. 395-408. [2948]

health - fgc fgm

no entries to this combination of country and topic

health - HIV AIDS and gender

Adamchak, D. / Mbizvo, M / Twanda, M. (1990): Male knowledge of and attitudes and practices towards AIDS in Zimbabwe, in: AIDS, vol. 4, pp. 245-250.[4079]

Adetunji, Jacob / Meekers, Dominique (2001): Consistency in condome use in the context of HIV/AIDS in Zimbabwe, in: Journal of Biosocial Science, vol. 33, no. 1, pp. 121-138.[4080]

Bassett, Mary / Mhloyi, Marvellos (1991): Women and AIDS in Zimbabwe, The making of an epidemic, in: International Journal of Health Services, vol. 21, pp.143-156.[4081]

Bassett, Mary / Sherman, J. (1994): Female sexual behaviour and the risk of HIV infection: An ethnographic study in Harare, Zimbabwe, Report Series no. 8, Women and AIDS Research Program, International Centre for Research on Women, Washington D.C.[4082]

Boohene, Ester et al. (1991): Fertility and contraception use among young adults in Harare, Zimbabwe, in: Studies in Family Planning, vol. 22, no. 4, pp. 264-271.[4083]

Bull-Christiansen, Lene (2013): ‘Respectable women’ versus ‘small houses’, Feminist negotiations of sexual morality, marriage and the challenge of HIV/AIDS in Zimbabwe, in: Journal of Southern African Studies, vol. 39, no. 3, pp. 511-526. [4084]

Bürger, Christine (1999): AIDS in Zimbabwe, Armut oder Tradition als Ursache der raschen Verbreitung? Die Wahrnehmung Professioneller und Betroffener, Lit-Verlag, Münster.[4085]

Chigudu, Hope (2007): Deepening our understanding of community-based participatory research, Lessons from work around reproductive rights in Zimbabwe, in: Gender and Development, vol. 15, issue 2, pp. 259-270.[4087]

Chikovore, J. / Mbizvo, M. (1999): AIDS related knowledge and sexual behaviour among commercial farm residents in Zimbabwe, in: Central African Journal of Medicine, vol. 45, no. 1, pp. 7-10.[4086]

Civic, D. / Wilson, D. (1996): Dry sex in Zimbabwe and implications for condome use, in: Social Science and Medicine, vol. 41, no. 1, pp. 91-98.[4088]

Cornwall, Andrea (2002): Body mapping: Bridging the gap between biomedical messages, popular knowledge and lived experience, in: Cornwall, Andrea / Welbourn, Alice (eds.): Realizing rights, Transforming approaches to sexual and reproductive well-being, Zed Books, London, pp. 219-231.[4089]

Cuthbeth, Tagwirei (2014): ‘Lame ducks’ in the time of HIV/AIDS? Exploring female victimhood in selected HIV/AIDS narratives by Zimbabwean female writers, in: Critical Arts, vol. 28, no. 2, pp. 216-228. [4090]

Erulkar, Annabel / Onoka, Charles / Phiri, Alford (2005): What is youth-friendly? Adolescents’ preference for reproductive health services in Kenya and Zimbabwe, in: African Journal of Reproductive Health, vol. 9, no. 3, pp. 51-58.[4091]

FAO (2006): Land and property rights of widows, single women and orphans in the context of HIV/AIDS, Case studies from Zimbabwe, HSRC Publications, Pretoria.[4092]

Feldman, Rayah / Manchester, Joanne / Maposhere, Caroline (2002): Positive women, Voices and choices in Zimbabwe, in: Cornwall, Andrea / Welbourn, Alice (eds.): Realizing rights, Transforming approaches to sexual and reproductive well-being, Zed Books, London, pp. 60-72.[4093]

Feldman, Rayah / Manchester, Joanne / Maposhere, Caroline (2003): Safe sex and reproductive choice, Findings from ‘positive women: Voices and choices’ in Zimbabwe, in: Reproductive Health Matters, vol. 11, no. 22, pp. 162-173.[4094]

Foster, G. / Mafuka, C. / Drew, R. et al. (1997): Factors leading to the establishment of child-headed households, The case of Zimbabwe, in: Health Transition Review, vol. 7, (supplement 2), pp. 155-168.[4096]

Foster, G. / Mafuka, C. / Drew, R. et al. (1997): Perceptions of children and community members concerning the circumstances of orphans in rural Zimbabwe, in: AIDS Care, vol. 9, no. 4, pp. 391-405.[4097]

Foster, G. / Shakespeare, F. / Chinemana, F. et al. (1995): Orphan prevalence and extended family care in a peri-urban community in Zimbabwe, in: AIDS Care, vol. 7, no. 1, pp. 3-17.[4095]

Francis-Chizororo, Monica (2010): Gowing up without parents, Socialisation and gender relations in orphaned-child-headed households in rural Zimbabwe, in: Journal of Southern African Studies, vol. 36, no. 3, pp. 711-727.[4098]

Francis-Chizororo, Monica / Natshalaga, N. R. (2003): The female condome, Acceptability and perception among rural women in Zimbabwe, in: African Journal of Reproductive Health, vol. 7, no. 3, pp. 101-116.[4099]

Goebel, Allison (2002): ‘Men these days, they are the problem’, Husband-taming herbs and gender wars in rural Zimbabwe, in: Canadian Journal of African Studies, vol. 36, no. 3, pp. 460-489[4100]

Grant, Miriam / Palmiere, Andrew (2003): When tea is a luxury, The economic impact of HIV/AIDS in Bulawayo, Zimbabwe, in: African Studies, vol. 62, no. 2, pp. 213-241.[4101]

Gregson, Simon (2004): Community group participation, Can it halp young women to avoid HIV? An exlorartory study of social capital and school education in rural Zimbabwe, in: Social Science and Medicine, vol. 58, no. 11, pp. 2119-2132.[4102]

Gregson, Simon / Zhuwa, T. et al. (2002): Sexual mixing patterns and sex differentials in teenage exposure to HIV infection in rural Zimbabwe, in: Lancet, vol. 359, no. 9, 1, pp. 896-903.[4103]

Grieser, Mira / Gittelsohn, Joel et al. (2001): Reproductive decision-making and the HIV/AIDS epidemic in Zimbabwe, in: Journal of Southern African Studies, vol. 27, no. 2, pp. 225-244.[4104]

Iliff, Peter (1995): Health for whom? Mother and child care in times of AIDS, poverty and ESAP, Mambo Press, Gweru.[4107]

Jackson, Helen (1992): Aids home care: A baseline survey in Zimbabwe, School of Social Work, Research Unit Series No. 3, Harare.[4105]

Jackson, Helen (1994): Family coping and Aids in Zimbabwe, School of Social Work, Research Unit Series No. 4, Harare.[4106]

Kaim, Barbara (2002): Involving young people in their reproductive health, A case study from Zimbabwe, in: Cornwall, Andrea / Welbourn, Alice (eds.): Realizing rights, Transforming approaches to sexual and reproductive well-being, Zed Books, London, pp. 181-190.[4108]

Kakaru, Doris / Paradza, Gaynor (2007): Reflections on the use of life history methods in reseraching rural women, Field experience from Uganda and Zimbabwe, in: Development and Change, in: Gender and Development, vol. 15, issue 2.[4109]

Kesby, M. (2000): Participatory diagramming as a means to improve communication about sex in rural Zimbabwe, A pilot study, in: Social Science and Medicine, vol. 50, no. 12, pp. 1723-1741.[4110]

Makina, Anesu (2009): Caring for people with HIV, State policies and ther dependence on women’s unpaid work, in: Gender and Development, vol. 17, no. 2, pp. 309-319.[4111]

Marshall, Mandy / Taylor, Nigel (2006): Tackling HIV and AIDS with faith-based communities, Learning from attitudes on gender relations and sexual rights within evangelical churches in Burkina Faso, Zimbabwe, and South Africa, in: Gender and Development, vol. 14, no. 3, pp. 363-374.[4112]

Meekers, Dominique (2005): Factors associated with use of the female condome in Zimbabawe, in: International Family Planning Perspectives, vol. 31, no. 1, pp. 30-37.[4113]

Meursing, K. (1997): A word of silence, Living with HIV in Matabeleland, Zimbabwe, Kit-Press, Amsterdam.[4114]

Meursing, K. / Sibindi, F. (1995): Condoms, family planning and living with HIV in Zimbabwe, in: Reproductive Health Matters, vol. 5, pp. 56-67.[4115]

Mhloyi, M. (1993): Perceptions on communication and sexuality in marriage in Zimbabwe, in: Women and Therapy, vol. 10, pp. 61-73.[4116]

Mi Kim, Y. et al. (2001): Promoting sexual responsibility among young people in Zimbabwe, in: Family Planning Perspectives, vol. 33, no. 2, pp. 11-19.[4117]

Moyo, W. / Mbizvo, M.T. (2002): Desire for a future pregnancy among women in Zimbabwe in relation to their self-perceived risk of HIV infection, child mortality, and spontaneous abortion, in: AIDS and Behaviour, vol. 8, no. 2, pp. 9-15.[4118]

Mupedziswa, R. (1997): Aids and older Zimbabweans: Who will care for the carers? in: Southern African Journal of Gerontology, vol. 6, no. 2, pp. 9-12.[4119]

Mutangadura, Gladys Bindura (2000): HIV/AIDS, poverty and elderly women in urban Zimbabwe, in: Southern African Feminist Review, vol. 4, no. 2, pp. 93-105.[4120]

Mutangadura, Gladys Bindura (2001): Women and AIDS in Southern Africa, The case of Zimbabwe and its policy implications, in: Jenda, A Journal of Culture and African Women’s Studies, vol. 1.2. www.jendajournal.com/jenda/vol1.2/mutangadura.html[4121]

Mutangadura, Gladys Bindura (2001): Women and AIDSs in Sub-Saharan Africa, The case of Zimbabwe and its policy implications, in: Jenda, 2.[4122]

Mutangadura, Gladys Bindura / Sandkjaer, Bjorg (2009): Mitigating the impact of HIV and AIDS on rural livelihoods in Southern Africa, in: Development in Practice, vol. 19, no. 2, pp. 214-226.[4123]

Nyamukapa, Constance / Foster, Geoff / Gregson, Simon (2003): Orphans’ household circumstances and access to education in a maturing HIV epidemic in Eastern Zimbabwe, in: Journal of Social Development in Africa, vol. 18, no. 2, pp. 7-32.[4124]

Pettifor, Audrey (2004): Early age of first sex, A risk factor for HIV infection among women in Zimbabwe, in: AIDS, An International bi-monthly Journal, vol. 18, no. 10, pp. 1435-1442.[4125]

Rasebotsa, Nobantu / Samuelson, Meg / Thomas, Kylie (2004): Nobody ever said AIDS, Stories and poems from Southern Africa, Kwela Books, Cape Town.[4126]

Robson, E. (2004): Hidden child workers, Young carers in Zimbabwe, in: Antipode, vol. 36, no. 2, pp. 227-248.[4127]

Rudd, Clare (2004): Case studies on child abuse in Zimbabwe, in: Richter, Linda / Dawes, Andrew / Higson-smith, Craig (eds.): Sexual abuse of young children in Southern Africa, Publications of the Human Science Research Council, Pretoria, pp. 395-410.[4128]

Sagemann, Rita (2000): Do women die faster, Frauen und HIV/AIDS in Simbabwe, Shaker Verlag, Aachen.[4129]

Schmitt, Ellen (1999): Aids und Gesellschaft in Zimbabwe, Beiträge zur Ethnomedizin Bd. 3, Verlag für Wissenschaft und Bildung, Berlin.[4130]

Shiripinda, Iris (2000): Legislative aspects in relation to HIV/AIDS prevention in Zimbabwe, in: South African Feminist Review, vol. 4, no. 1, pp. 37-46.[4131]

Watts, Ch. / Ndlovu, M. / Keogh, E. / Kwaramba, R. (1998): Withholding of sex and forced sex, Dimensions of violence against Zimbabwean women, in: Reproductive Health Matters, vol. 6, no. 12, pp. 57-65.[4133]

Wekwete, N. (2010): Adolescent pregnancy challenges in the era of HIV and AIDS, A case study of a selected rural area in Zimbabwe, OSSREA, Addis Abeba.[4132]

West, Michael (1994): Nationalism, race and gender, The politics of family planning in Zimbabwe, 1957-1990, in: Social Science and Medicine, vol. 73, pp. 447-471.[4134]

West, Michael (1997): Liquor and libido, Joint drinking and the politics of sexual control in colonial Zimbabwe, 1920s-1950s, in: Journal of Social History, vol. 30, no. 3, pp. 645-667.[4135]

Wilson, David et al. (1990): A pilot study for an HIV prevention programme among commercial sex workers in Bulawayo, Zimbabwe, in: Social Science and Medicine, 31, 5, pp. 609-618.[4136]

Zimbabwe Women’s Resource Centre and Network (ZWRCN) (2003): Gender and HIV/AIDS/STD, An analysis of the national policies and programs on HIV/AIDS/STD in Zimbabwe, ZWRCN, Harare.[4137]

health - reproduction and fertility

Boohene, Ester et al. (1991): Fertility and contraception use among young adults in Harare, Zimbabwe, in: Studies in Family Planning, vol. 22, no. 4, pp. 264-271.[4897]

Brooke, Johnson et al. (2002): Reducing unplanned pregnancy and abortion in Zimbabwe through postabortion contracepation, in: Studies in Family Planning, vol. 33, no. 2, pp. 195-202.[4898]

Chigudu, Hope Bagyendera (2007): Deepening our understanding of community-based participatory research, Lessons from work around reproductive rights in Zimbabwe, in: Gender and Development, vol. 15, issue 2, pp. 259-270.[4899]

Chikovore, Jeremiah / Nystrom, Lennarth et al. (2003): Denial and violence, Paradoxes in men’s perspectives on premarital sex and pregnancy in rural Zimbabwe, in: African Sociological Review, vol. 7, no. 1, pp. 53-72.[4900]

Cornwall, Andrea (2002): Body mapping: Bridging the gap between biomedical messages, popular knowledge and lived experience, in: Cornwall, Andrea / Welbourn, Alice (eds.): Realizing rights, Transforming approaches to sexual and reproductive well-being, Zed Books, London, pp. 219-231.[4901]

Erulkar, Annabel / Onoka, Charles / Phiri, Alford (2005): What is youth-friendly? Adolescents’ preference for reproductive health services in Kenya and Zimbabwe, in: African Journal of Reproductive Health, vol. 9, no. 3, pp. 51-58.[4902]

Feldman, Rayah / Manchester, Joanne / Maposhere, Caroline (2002): Positive women, Voices and choices in Zimbabwe, in: Cornwall, Andrea / Welbourn, Alice (eds.): Realizing rights, Transforming approaches to sexual and reproductive well-being, Zed Books, London, pp. 60-72.[4903]

Feldman, Rayah / Manchester, Joanne / Maposhere, Caroline (2003): Safe sex and reproductive choice, Findings from ‘positive women: Voices and choices’ in Zimbabwe, in: Reproductive Health Matters, vol. 11, no. 22, pp. 162-173.[4904]

Goebel, Allison (2002): ‘Men these days, they are the problem’, Husband-taming herbs and gender wars in rural Zimbabwe, in: Canadian Journal of African Studies, vol. 36, no. 3, pp. 460-489[4905]

Grieser, Mira / Gittelsohn, Joel et al. (2001): Reproductive decision-making and the HIV/AIDS epidemic in Zimbabwe, in: Journal of Southern African Studies, vol. 27, no. 2, pp. 225-244.[4906]

Gwebu, Thando D. (2006): Intra-rural fertility determinants in Zimbabwe, A path analysis, in: African Population Studies, vol. 21, no. 1, pp. 71-91.[4907]

Hellum, Anne (1992): Law’s forum, content and context: The case of changing and coexisting modes of regulation of human reproduction in Zimbabwe, Childless women’s perspectives, in: Adelman, S. / Paliwala, S.A. (Hg.): Law, crisis and underdevelopment, London.[4908]

Hellum, Anne (1993): Gender and legal change in Zimbabwe, Childless women and divorce from a socio-cultural and historical perspective, in: Adelman, Samy / Paliwals, Abdul (eds.): Law and crisis in the third world, Hans Zell Publications, London, pp. 243-269.[4909]

Hellum, Anne (1993): Gender, law and democratisation: Reproductive regulation and legal pluralism in Zimbabwe, in: Ofstad, Arve (ed.): Development theory: Recent trends, Report of the Chr. Michelsen Institute, Bergen, pp. 155-173.[4910]

Hellum, Anne (1999): Women's human rights and legal pluralism in Africa: Mixed norms and identities in infertility management in Zimbabwe, Tano Aschehoug, Mond Books Oslo. [4911]

Hof, C. / Richters, A. (1999): Exploring intersections between teenage pregnancy and gender violence, Lessons from Zimbabwe, in: Journal of Reproductive Health, vol. 3, no. 1, pp. 51-66.[4912]

Kaim, Barbara (2002): Involving young people in their reproductive health, A case study from Zimbabwe, in: Cornwall, Andrea / Welbourn, Alice (eds.): Realizing rights, Transforming approaches to sexual and reproductive well-being, Zed Books, London, pp. 181-190.[4913]

Kaler, Amy (1998): A threat to the nation and a threat to the men, The banning of Depo-Provera in Zimbabwe, in: Journal of Southern African Studies, vol. 24, no. 2, pp. 347-376.[4914]

Kaler, Amy (2000): Who has told you this thing? Toward a feminist interpretation of contraceptive diffusion in Rhodesia, 1970-1980, in: Signs, Journal of Women in Culture and Society, vol. 25, no. 3, pp. 677-708.[4915]

Kaler, Amy (2002): Gender and fertility in a post-colonial moment, in: Woodward, Wendy / Minkley, Gary / Hayes, Patricia (eds.): Deep hiStories, Gender and colonialism in southern Africa, Rodopi Publishers, Amsterdam, pp. 231-263.[4916]

Kaler, Amy (2003): Running after pills, Politics, gender and contraception in colonial Zimbabwe, Greenwood Publishers, Westport.[4917]

Mazur, Robert / Mhloyi, Marvellous (1994): Women’s work and fertility in Zimbabwe: Ending underdevelopment with change, in: Adepoju, Aderanti / Oppong, Christine (eds.): Gender, work and population in Sub-Saharan Africa, Routledge, London, pp. 132-156.[4918]

Mbizvo, M. / Adamchak, D. (1991): Family planning knowledge, attitudes and practices of men in Zimbabwe, in: Studies in Family Planning, vol. 22, pp. 31-38.[4919]

Meekers, D. (2005): Factors associated with use of the female condome in Zimbabawe, in: International Family Planning Perspectives, vol. 31, no. 1, pp. 30-37.[4920]

Meursing, K. / Sibindi, F. (1995): Condoms, family planning and living with HIV in Zimbabwe, in: Reproductive Health Matters, vol. 5, pp. 56-67.[4921]

Meursing, K. / Sibindi, F. (1995): Child sexual abuse in Matabeleland, Zimbabwe, in: Social Science and Medicine, vol. 41, no. 12, pp. 1693-1704.[4922]

Moyo, W. / Mbizvo, M.T. (2002): Desire for a future pregnancy among women in Zimbabwe in relation to their self-perceived risk of HIV infection, child mortality, and spontaneous abortion, in: AIDS and Behaviour, vol. 8, no. 2, pp. 9-15.[4923]

Potts, Deborah (2001): Fertility in Southern Africa, in: Journal of Southern African Studies, vol. 27, no. 2, pp. 189-302.[4924]

Rowley, Chishamiso (2000): Challenges to effective maternal health care delivery, The case of traditional certified nurse midwives in Zimbabwe, in: Journal of Asian and African Studies, vol. 35, pp. 251-263.[4925]

Siziya, S. et al. (1998): Adolescent pregnancy in Zimbabwe, Distribution of socio-geographic factors, in: African Journal of Health Science, 5, pp. 174-177.[4926]

Thomas, D. / Maluccio, J. (1995): Contraceptive choice, fertility and public policy in Zimbabwe, World Bank Working Paper no. 109, The World Bank, Washington D.C.[4927]

Way, Ann A. / Cross, Anne R. / Kumar, Sushil (1987): Family planning in Botswana, Kenya, and Zimbabwe, in: International Family Planning Perspectives, vol. 13, pp. 7-11.[4928]

Wekwete, Naomi (1994): The status of women and fertility in Zimbabwe, In: Muhwava, William (ed.): The demography of Zimbabwe, some research findings, Harare, pp. 5-27.[4929]

WLSA (2001): Pregnancy and childbirth: Joy or despair? Women and gender-generated reproductive crimes of violence. Written by Julie Stewart & Ellen Sithole et al., WLSA Publications, Harare.[4930]

health

Hanmar, Lucia (1994): Welfare and user free finance health care? The impact of gender on policy outcomes, Theory and evidence from Zimbabwe, ISS Working Paper no. 180, Institute of Social Studies, Den Haag.[5092]

Rowley, Chishamiso (2000): Challenges to effective maternal health care delivery, The case of traditional certified nurse midwives in Zimbabwe, in: Journal of Asian and African Studies, vol. 35, pp. 251-263.[5093]

Wright, Marcia (1988): Women and children's health in Southern Africa: A reconnaisance in Tanzania, Zambia, Zimbabwe, and Botswana, in: Wright, Marcia / Stein, Zena A. / Scandlyn, Jean (eds.): Women's health and apartheid: The health of women and children and the future of progressive primary health care in Southern Africa, Columbia University Press, New York, pp. 143-158.[5094]

history colonialism and pre-colonial history

Barnes, Teresa (1992): The fight for control of African women’s mobility in colonial Zimbabwe, 1900-1939, in: Signs, Journal of Women in Culture and Society, vol. 17, pp. 586-608.[5651]

Barnes, Teresa (1997): „Am I a man?“: Gender and the pass laws in urban colonial Zimbabwe, 1930-1980, in: African Studies Review, vol. 40, no. 1, pp. 59-81.[5652]

Barnes, Teresa (1999): We women work so hard, Gender, urbanisation and social reproduction in colonial Harare, Zimbabwe, 1930-1956, James Currey Publishers, London / Oxford.[5653]

Barnes, Teresa (2002): Virgin territory? Travel and migration by African women in twentieth-century southern Africa, in: Allman, Jean / Geiger, Susan / Musisi, Nakanyike (eds.): Women in colonial African histories, Indiana University Press, Bloomington, pp. 164-190.[5654]

Benson, Koni / Chadya, Joyce (2005): Learning sexual violence in Bulawayo, Colonial Zimbabwe, 1946-1956, in: Journal of Southern African Studies, vol. 31, no. 3, pp. 587-610.[5655]

Burke, Timothy (1996): ‘Fork up and smile’: Marketing, colonial knowledge and the female subject in Zimbabwe, in: Gender and History, vol. 8, no. 3, pp. 440-456.[5656]

Jackson, Lynette (1993): Gendered disorder in colonial Zimbabwe, Case analyses of African female inmates at the Ingutsheni Mental Hospital, 1932-1957, Institute of Commonwealth Studies, collected seminar papers, 19, no. 45, The societies of Southern Africa in the 19th and 20th century, London.[5657]

Jackson, Lynette (1999): ‘Stray women’ and ‘girls on the move’, Gender, space, and disease control in colonial and post-colonial Zimbabwe, in: Zeleza, Paul Tiyambe / Kalipeni, Ezekiel (eds.):Sacred spaces and public quarrels, African cultural and economic landscapes, Africa World Press, Trenton, pp. 147-167.[5658]

Jackson, Lynette (2002): “When in the white men’s town”, Zimbabwean women remember chibeura, in: Allman, Jean / Geiger, Susan / Musisi, Nakanyike (eds.): Women in colonial African histories, Indiana University Press, Bloomington, pp. 191-215.[5659]

Jackson, Lynette (2002): Sex and the politics of space in colonial Zimbabwe, The story of Chibheura (open your legs) exams, in: Bond, George / Gibson, Nigel (ed.): Contested terrains and constructed categories, Contemporary Africa in focus, Westview Press, Bouder, pp. 299-320.[5660]

Jeater, Diana (1993): Marriage, perversion, and power, The construction of moral discourse in Southern Rhodesia, 1894-1930, Claredon Press, Oxford.[5661]

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Lowry, Donal (2000): “Making fresh Britains across the sea”, Imperial authority and anti-feminism in Rhodesia, in: Fletscher, Ian Christopher / Mayhall Nym, Laura / Levine, Phillipa (eds.): Women’s suffrage in the British empire, Citizenship, nation and race, Routledge, London, pp. 175-190.[5668]

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Schmidt, Elizabeth (1992): Peasants, traders and wives - Shona women in the history of Zimbabwe, 1870-1939, London.[5679]

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Summers, Carol (1999): Mission boys, civilized men and marriage, Educated African men in the missions of Southern Rhodesia, 1920-1945, in: Journal of Religious History, vol. 23, no. 1, pp. 75-91.[5683]

Yoshikuni, Tsuneo (2008): Elisabeth Musodzi and the birth of African feminism in early colonial Zimbabwe, Weaver Press, Harare.[5684]

Zimudzi, Tapiwa (2004): African women, violent crime and criminal law in colonial Zimbabwe, 1900-1952, in: Journal of Southern African Studies, vol. 30, no. 3, pp. 499-518.[5685]

Literature

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Hunter, Eva (2000): Zimbabwean nationalism and motherhood in Yvonne Vera’s Butterfly burning, in: African Studies, vol. 59, no. 2, pp. 229-243.[6368]

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Kopf, Martina (2002): A voice full of unremembered things, Literarische Darstellung sexueller Gewalt in Yvonne Veras Roman “Under the tongue”, in: Stichproben, Wiener Zeitschrift für Afrikastudien, 4, pp. 1-21.[6370]

Kopf, Martina (2005): Trauma und Literatur, Das Nicht-Erzählbare erzählen, Assia Djerba und Yvonne Vera, Brandes & Apsel, Frankfurt a.M.[6371]

Lazzari, Gabriela (2018): Peripheral Realism and the Bildungsroman in Tsitsi Dangarembga´s Nervous Conditions, in: Research in African Literatures, vol. 49, no. 2, pp. 107-124.[11589]

Lenta, Margaret (2005): Fiction and history, Unity Dow’s ‘Juggling truths’ and Tsitsi Dangaremgba’s ‘Nervous conditions’, in: English Academy Review, vol. 22, pp. 43-54.[6372]

Lewis, Desiree (2005): A tribute to Yvonne Vera, 19.9.1964-7.4.2005, in: Feminist Africa, issue 4, www.feministafrica.org[6373]

Ludicke, Penny (1997): Writing from the inside-out, Reading from the outside-in: A review of Yvonne Vera’s Nehanda and Without a name, in: Wright, Derek (ed.): Contemporary African fiction, Bayreuth African Studies, Bayreuth, pp. 67-73.[6374]

Mabura, Lily G.N. (2010): Black women walking, in: Research in Afrian Literature, vol. 41, no. 3, pp.81-111.[11584]

Matshakayile-Ndlovu, Tommy (2007): The Changing Roles of Women in siNdebele Literature, in: Matatu, 27. [11570]

McWilliams, Sally (1991): Tsitsi Dangarembgy’s „Nervous Conditions“: At the crossroads of feminism and post-colonialism, in: World Literature Written in English, 31, 1, pp. 103-112.[6375]

Morris, Jane (ed.) (2008): Long time coming: Short writings from Zimbabwe, Amabooks, Harare.[6376]

Moyana, Rosemary (1994): Tsitsi Dangarembga’s Nervous Conditions: An attempt in the feminist tradition, in: Zambezia, vol. 22, no. 1, pp. 23-42.[6377]

Msengesi, Chideza (1994): No burden is so binding that it could not be dropped - Zimbabwean Women Writers on their way to self help, in: Brandsteller, Anna-Maria / Neubert, Dieter / Grohs, Gerhard (Hg.): Afrika hilft sich selbst, Prozesse der Institutionalisierung der Selbstorganisation, Lit-Verlag, Münster - Hamburg, pp. 52-56.[6378]

Muchemwa, Kizito Z. / Muponde, Robert (eds.) (2007): Manning the nation, Father figures in Zimbabwean literature and society, Weaver Press, Harare.[6379]

Muponde, Robert / Maodzwa-Taruvinga, Mandivavarira (ed.) (2002): Sign and taboo, Perspectives on the poetic fiction of Yvonne Vera, Weaver Press, Harare / James Currey, Oxford.[6381]

Mupondo, Robert (2007): Reading girlhood under the tongue, in: Research in African Literatures, vol. 38, no. 2, pp. 36-48.[6380]

Musanga, Terrence / Mutekwa, Anias (2013): Supra-masculinities and supra-feminiities in Solomon Mutsvairo’s ‘Chaminuka, Prophet of Zimbabwe’ (1983) and Yvonne Vera’s ‘Nehanda’ (1993), in: African Identities, vol. 11, no. 1, pp. 79-92.[6382]

Musila, Grace (2007): Embodying experience and agency in Yvonne Vera’s Without a name and Butterfly burning, in: Research in African Literatures, vol. 38, no. 2, pp. 36-48.[6383]

Nfah-Abbenyi, Juliana Makuchi (1997): Gender in African women’s writing, Identity, sexuality, and difference, Indiana University Press, Bloomington.[6384]

Niemi, Minna Johanna (2021): Critical representation of neoliberal capitalism and uneven development in Tsitsi Dangarembga´s This mournable body, in: Journal of Southern African Studies, vol 47, no. 5. pp.869-888.[11587]

Ouahmiche, G. / Boughouas, L. (2016): Tsitsi Dangarembgas Nervous Conditions, in: Journal of International Literature and Arts, vol. 4, no. 6, pp. 104-112.[11585]

Owomoyela, Oyekan (1992): Identity and cultural representation in the colonised African psyche, Mariama Ba’s Scarlet song and Tsitsi Dangarembga’s Nervous conditions, in: Smit, Johannes (ed.): Body, identity, sub-cultures and repression in texts from Africa, CSSALL, Durban, pp. 77-110.[6385]

Parpart, Jane (2004): Masculinities, race and violence in the making of Zimbabwe, in: Muchemw, Kizito / Muponde, Robert (eds.): Manning the nation, Father figures in Zimbabwean literture and society, Weaver Press, Harare, pp. 102-114.[6386]

Phillips, Maggi (1994): Engaging dreams: Perspectives on Flora Nwapa, Buchi Emecheta, Ama Ata Aidoo, Bessie Head, and Tsitsi Dangarembga writing, in: Research in African Literature, vol. 25, no. 4, pp. 89-103.[6387]

Pimorac, Ranka (2001): Crossing the space of memory, Boderline identities in novels by Yvonne Vera, in: Journal of Commonwealth Literature, vol. 36, no. 2, pp. 77-93.[6388]

Pimorac, Ranka (2005): Blood on the sand, Yvonne Vera’s Butterfly burning and the Zimbabwean tradition, in: WASAFIRI, no. 46, pp. 11-16.[6389]

Ranger, Terence (1999): The fruits of the Baobab, Irene Staunton and the Zimbawean novel, in: Journal of Southern African Studies, vol. 24, no. 4, pp. 695-701.[6390]

Rooney, Caroline (1991): Mothers of the revolution, Zimbabwean women in the aftermath of war, in: African Languages and Cultures, vol. 4, no. 1, pp. 55-64.[6391]

Rooney, Caroline (1995): Re-possessions: Inheritance and independence in Chenjerai Hove’s Bones and Tsitsi Dangarembga’s Nervous Conditions, in: Gurnah, Abdulrazak (ed.): Essays on African Writing, Contemporary Literature, Heinemann Publishers, Oxford, pp. 119-143.[6392]

Samuelson, Meg (2007): Yvonne Vera’s Bulawayo, Modernity, (im)morality, music and memory, in: Research in African Literatures, vol. 38, no. 2, pp. 22-35.[6393]

Shaw, Carolyn Martin (2004): Turning her back on the moon, Virginity, sexuality and mothering in the works of Yvonne Vera, in: Africa Today, vol. 51, no. 2, pp. 15-32.[6394]

Shaw, Carolyn Martin (2004): ‘You had a daughter, but I am becoming a woman’, Sexuality, feminism and post-colony in Tsitsi Dangarembga’s ‘Nervous conditions’ and ‘She no longer weeps’, in: Research in African Literature, vol. 38, no. 4, pp. 7-27.[6395]

Sizemore, Christine (1997): Negotiating between ideologies, The search for identity in Tsitsi Dangarembga’s ‘Nervous conditions’ and Margaret Atwood’s ‘Cat’s eye’, in: Women Studies Quarterly, vol. 25, no. 3-4, pp. 68-82.[6396]

Staunton, Irene (ed.) (2008): Women writing Zimbabwe, Weaver Press, Harare.[6397]

Stobie, Cheryl (2008): Fissures in Apartheid’s “eden”: Representations of bisexuality in The smell of apples by Mark Behr, in: Research in African Literatures, vol. 39, 1, pp. 70-86.[6398]

Sugnet, Charles (1997): Nervous conditions: Dangarembga’s feminist reinvention of Fanon, in: Nnaemeka, Obioma (ed.): The politics of (m)othering, Womenhood, identity, and resistance in African literature, London, New York, Routledge Press, pp. 33-49.[6399]

Thomas, Sue (1992): Killing the hysteric in the colonized’s house: Tsitsi Dangarembga’s Nervous Conditions, in: Journal of Commonwealth Literature, vol. 26, no.l, pp. 26-36.[6400]

Vambe, Taonezvi, Maurice (2003): HIV/AIDS, African sexuality and the problem of representation in Zimbabwean literature, in: Journal of Contemporary African Studies, vol. 21, no. 3, pp. 473-487.[6402]

Veit-Wild, Flora (1987): Creating a new society: Women’s writing in Zimbabwe, in: Journal of Commonwealth Literature, vol. 22, no. 1, pp. 171-178.[6403]

Veit-Wild, Flora (1989): „Women write about things that move them.“ Interview mit Tsitsi Dangarembga, in: Boyce Davies, Carole (ed.): Crossing the boundaries, Black women’s writing, Frankfurt,Verlag Holger Ehling, pp. 101-114.[6404]

Veit-Wild, Flora (2005): Tsitsi Dangarembga`s film: Kare, Kare Zvako, The survival of the butchered woman, in: Research in African Literatures, vol. 36, no. 2, pp. 132-138.[6405]

Veit-Wild, Flora / Naguschewski, Dirk (eds.) (2005): Body, sexuality and gender, Versions and sub-versions in African Literature, 1, Rodopi, Amsterdam.[6406]

Weiss, Bettina (2004): Tangible voice throwing, Empowering corporeal discourses in African women’s writing in Southern Africa, Peter Lang, Frankfurt a.M.[6407]

Wilkinson, Jane (1992): Talking with African writers: Tsitsi Dangarembga, in: Wilkinson, Jane (ed.): Talking with African writers, James Currey Publishers, London, pp. 188-198.[6409]

Willey, Ann Elizabeth / Treiber, Jeanette (eds.) (2002): Emerging perspectives on Tsitsi Dangarembga, Negotiating the postcolonial, Africa World Press, Trenton.[6408]

Wilson-Tagoe, Nana (1999): Narrative, history, novel: Intertextuality in the historical novel of Ayi Kwei Armah and Yvonne Vera, in: Journal of African Cultural Studies, vol. 12, no. 2, pp. 155-166.[6410]

Wright, Derek (1997): Regurgitating colonialism: The feminist voice in Tsitsi Dangarembga’s Nervous Conditions, in: Wright, Derek: New directions in African fiction, Twayne Publishers, New York, pp. 108-122.[6411]

Yesibo, J. E. (2018): Female self determination in Tsitsi Dangarembgas She no longer weeps, in: Review of Arts and Humanities, vol. 7, no. 2, pp. 11-16.[11586]

Zeleza, Paul (2007): Colonial fictions, Memory and history in Yvonne Vera’s imagination, in: Research in African Literatures, vol. 38, no. 2, pp. 9-21.[6412]

Zhuwarara, R. (1994): Men and women in colonial context, A discource on gender and liberation in Chenjerai Hove’s 1989 Norma award winning novel: BONES, in: Zambezia, vol. 21, no. 1, pp. 1-22.[6413]

Zimbabwe Women Writers (1992): Gazing at the Environment, A selection of writing by women on the environment, Harare.[6414]

Zimbabwe Women Writers (1994): Anthology No.1, Harare.[6415]

media

Hove, Elizabeth (2017): ‘Of witches, babes, and wife bashers, Images of gender in Zimbabwean tabloids, in: Journal of African Media Studies, vol. 9, no. 1, pp. 163-179.[6576]

politics - wars violent conflicts

Bond-Stewart, Kathy (1984): Young women in the liberation struggle, Stories and poems from Zimbabwe, Harare.[6988]

Israel, Mark / Lyons, Tanya / Mason, C. (2002): Women, resistance and Africa: Armed struggles in Zimbabwe, South Africa and Eritrea, in: Humanity and Society, vol. 26, no. 3, pp. 196-213.[6989]

Jaji, Rose (2020): Gendered subjectivities, The nexus between femininity and peacebuilding in Zimbabwe, in: African Journal of Conflict and Peacebuilding Review, vol. 10, no. 1, pp. 1-27.[6990]

Kesby, Mike (1996): Arenas for control, terrains of gender contestation: Guerilla struggle and counter-insurgency warfare in Zimbabwe, in: Journal of Southern African Studies, vol. 22, no. 4, pp. 561-584.[6991]

Kriger, Norma (1992): Zimbabwe’s guerrilla war, Peasant voices, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge.[6992]

Lyons, Tanya (2002): Guerrilla girls and women in the Zimbabwean national liberation struggle, in: Allman, Jean / Geiger, Susan / Musisi, Nakanyike (eds.): Women in colonial African histories, Indiana University Press, Bloomington, pp. 305-326.[6993]

Lyons, Tanya (2004): Guns and guerrilla girls, Women in the Zimbabwean national liberation struggle, Africa World Press, Trenton/Lawrenceville.[6994]

Müller, Barbara (2002): Der falsche Zeitpunkt, Frauen und der Kampf für Befreiung in Zimbabwe, in: Periplus, 12. Jahrgang, pp. 35-59.[6995]

Nhongo-Simbanegavi, Josephine (2000): For better or worse, Women and ZANLA in Zimbabwe’s liberation struggle, Weaver Press, Harare.[6996]

Pankhurst, Donna (1988): Women’s lives and women’s struggle in rural Zimbabwe, University of Leeds Southern Africa Research Series 6, Leeds.[6997]

Ranchod-Nilsson, Sita (1992): „Educating Eve“: The women’s club movement and political consciousness among rural African women in Southern Rhodesia, 1950-1980, in: Tranberg Hansen, Karen (ed.): African encounters with domesticity, New Brunswick, pp. 195-217.[6998]

Ranchod-Nilsson, Sita (1994): „This too, is a way of fighting“, Rural women’s participation in Zimbabwe’s liberation war, in: Tétreault, Mary Ann (Hg.): Women and the revolution in Africa, Asian and the New World, University of California Press, Columbia, pp. 62-88.[6999]

Schmidt, Heike (1996): Love and healing in forced communities: Borderlands in Zimbabwe’s war of liberation, in: Asiwaju, A.I. / Nugent, P. (eds.)African boundaries: Barriers, conduits and opportunities, London, pp. 183-204.[7000]

Schmidt, Heike (1997): Healing the wounds of war: Memories of violence and the making of history in Zimbabwe’s most recent past, in: Journal of Southern African Studies, vol. 23, no. 2, pp. 301-310.[7001]

Staunton, Irene (1990): Mothers of the revolution, Baobab Books, Harare.[7002]

Stott, Leda (1989): Women and the armed struggle for independence in Zimbabwe (1964-1979), Edingburgh.[7003]

Sylvester, Christine (1990): Simultaneous revolutions, The Zimbabwean case, in: Journal of Southern Africa, vol. 16, no. 3, pp. 452-475.[7004]

Win, Everjoice (2004): ‘Are there any people here?’ Violence against women in the Zimbabwean conflict, in: Agenda, no. 59, pp. 17-21.[7005]

politics

Bull-Christiansen, Lene (2004): Tales of the nation, Feminist nationalism or patriotic history? Defining national history and identity in Zimbabwe, Nordic Africa Institute, Uppsala.[7570]

Chigudu, Hope Bagyendera / Tichagwa, Wilfred (1995): Participation of women in party politics, ZWRCN Discussion Paper No. 9, Harare.[7571]

Chimedza, Ruvimbo (1987): Women and decision-making, The case of district councils in Zimbabwe, in: Qunta, Chritine (ed.): Women in Southern Africa, Johannesburg, pp. 135-145.[7572]

Heinrich-Boell-Foundation (2001): Gender gaps in our constitutions, Women`s concern in selected African countries, Heinrich Boell Foundation, Nairobi.[7582]

Jacobs, Susan / Howard, Tracey (1987): Women in Zimbabwe, stated policy and stated action, in: Afshar, Haleh (ed.): Women, state and ideology, Routledge, London, pp. 28-47.[7573]

Kanji, Nazneen / Jazdowska, Niki (1994): Structural adjustment and women in Zimbabwe. In: Review of African Political Economy, no. 56, pp. 11-26.[7574]

Kesby, Mike (1996): Arenas for control, terrains of gender contestation: Guerilla struggle and counter-insurgency warfare in Zimbabwe, in: Journal of Southern African Studies, vol. 22, no. 4, pp. 561-584.[7575]

Madsen, Diana (ed.) (2020): Gendered institutions and women’s political representation in Africa, Nordic Africa Institute, Uppsala / Zed Book, London.[7576]

Osrim, Mary Johnson (1994): Women, work, and public policy: Structural adjustment and the informal sector in Zimbabwe, in: Kalipeni, Ezekiel (ed.): Population growth and environmental degradation in Southern Africa, Boulder, pp. 61-84.[7577]

Ranchold-Nilsson, Sita (1994): “This too, is a way of fighting!” in: Tétreault, Mary Ann (ed.): Women and revolution in Africa, Asia and the new world, University of California Press, Berkeley, pp. 62-88.[7578]

Ranchold-Nilsson, Sita (1998): Zimbabwe: Women, cultural crisis, and the reconfiguration of the one-party state, in: Villalón, Leonardo / Huxtable, Philipp (eds.): The African state at a critical juncture, Between disintegration and reconfiguration, Lynne Rienner, Boulder, pp. 255-276.[7579]

Vijfhuizen, Carin (1997): Rain-making, political conflicts and gender images: A case from Mutema chieftaincy in Zimbabwe, in: Zambezia, 24, i, pp. 31-49.[7580]

Win, Everjoice (2004): When sharing female identity is not enough, Coalition building in the midst of political polarisation in Zimbabwe, in: Sweetman, Caroline (ed.): Gender, development and diversity, Oxfam Publications, Oxford, (Gender and Development vol. 12, no. 1), pp. 19-27.[7581]

Religion - Christianity

Gregson, Simon / Zhuwa, Tom / Anderson, Roy / Chandiwana, Stephen (1999): Apostles and Zionists: The influence of religion on demographic change in Zimbabwe, in: Population Studies, vol. 53, pp.179-193.[7741]

Hinfelaar, Marja (2001): Respectable and responsible women, Methodist and Roman Catholic Women`s organisations in Harare, Zimbabwe (1919-1985), Mission no. 30, Zoetermeer. [7742]

Marshall, Mandy / Taylor, Nigel (2006): Tackling HIV and AIDS with faith-based communities, Learning from attitudes on gender relations and sexual rights within evangelical churches in Burkina Faso, Zimbabwe, and South Africa, in: Gender and Development, vol. 14, no. 3, pp. 363-374.[7743]

Mate, Rekopantswe (2002): Wombs as god`s laboratories, Pentecostal discource of femininity in Zimbabwe, in: Africa , vol. 72, no. 4, pp. 549-567.[7744]

Moss, Barbara A. (1990): Holding body and soul together: The history of the Zimbabwean Women’s Ruwadsano Manyano in Methodist Churches, 1890-1980, Bloomington.[7745]

Muzorewa, Farai David (1975): Through prayer and action: The Rukwadzano women of Rhodesia, in: Ranger, T.O. / Weller, John (eds.): Themes in Christian History in Central Africa, Heinemann, London, pp. 256-268.[7746]

Scarnecchia, Timothy (1997): Mai Chaza’s Guta re Jehova (City of God): Gender, healing and urban identity in an African independent church, in: Journal of Southern African Studies, vol. 23, no. 1, pp. 87-105.[7747]

Summers, Carol (1999): Mission boys, civilized men and marriage, Educated African men in the missions of Southern Rhodesia, 1920-1945, in: Journal of Religious History, vol. 23, no. 1, pp. 75-91.[7748]

Togarasei, Lovemore (2007): Images of Jesus among Christian women in Harare, in: Studies in World Christianity, vol. 13, no. 2, pp. 160-169.[7749]

Urban-Mead, Wendy (2008): Negotiating 'plainness' and gender, Dancing and apparel at Christian weddings in Matabeleland, Zimbabwe, 1913-1944, in: Journal of Religion in Africa, vol. 38, no. 2, pp. 209-246.[7750]

Urban-Mead, Wendy (2015): The gender of piety, Family, faith, and colonial rule in Matabeleland, Zimbabwe, Ohio University Press, Athens.[7751]

Religion - Islam

no entries to this combination of country and topic

Religion - traditional rituals and spirit mediumship

Vijfhuizen, Carin (1997): Rain-making, political conflicts and gender images: A case from Mutema chieftaincy in Zimbabwe, in: Zambezia, 24, i, pp. 31-49.[10318]

Rights - human rights violations gender based violence

Armstrong, Alice (1997): Consent and compensation, the sexual abuse of girls in Zimbabwe, in: Ncube, Welshman (ed.): Law, culture, tradition and children’s rights in Eastern and Southern Africa, Ashgate, Dartmouth, pp. 129-149.[10791]

Armstrong, Alice (1998): Culture and choice, Lessons from survivors of gender violence in Zimbabwe, Harare.[10792]

Benson, Koni / Chadya, Joyce (2005): Learning sexual violence in Bulawayo, Colonial Zimbabwe, 1946-1956, in: Journal of Southern African Studies, vol. 31, no. 3, pp. 587-610.[10793]

Chikovere, Jeremiah / Nystrom, Lennarth / Lindmark, Gunilla / Ahlberg, Beth Maina (2003): Denial and violence, Paradoxes in men’s perspectives to premarital sex and pregnancy in rural Zimbabwe, in: African Sociological Review, vol. 7, no. 1, pp. 53-72.[10794]

Hof, C. / Richters, A. (1999): Exploring intersections between teenage pregnancy and gender violence, Lessons from Zimbabwe, in: Journal of Reproductive Health, vol. 3, no. 1, pp. 51-66.[10795]

Taylor, Jill / Stewart, Shellagh (1991): Sexual and domestic violence, Help, recovery and action in Zimbabwe, WLSA Publications, Harare.[10796]

Zimudzi, Tapiwa (2004): African women, violent crime and criminal law in colonial Zimbabwe, 1900-1952, in: Journal of Southern African Studies, vol. 30, no. 3, pp. 499-518.[10797]

Rights - Women Human Rights and legal system

Amanor-Wilks, Dede (1996): Invisible hands: Women in Zimbabwe’s commercial farm sector, in: Southern African Feminist Review, vol. 1, no. 1, pp. 37-57.[11490]

Armstrong, Alice (1992): Struggling over scare resources, Women and maintenance in Southern Africa, WLSA Regional Report, University of Zimbabwe Publications, Harare.[11491]

Armstrong, Alice (1994): School and Sadza: Custody and the best interests of the child in Zimbabwe' in: International Journal of Law and the Family, vol. 8, p. 151.[11492]

Armstrong, Alice (1997): Law and the family in Southern Africa, in: Adepoju, Aderanti (ed.): Family, population and development in Africa, Zed Books, London, pp. 183-202.[11493]

Armstrong, Alice (1998): Culture and choice, Lessons from survivors of gender violence in Zimbabwe, Violence against women in Zimbabwe Research Project, Frontline Publications, Harare.[11494]

Armstrong, Alice / Himonga, Chuma (1993): Uncovering realtity: Excarvating women’s rights in African family law. WLSA Working Paper, No. 7, Harare.[11495]

Bigge, D. / Briesen, A. v. (2000): Conflict in the Zimbabwean courts, Women’s rights and indigenous self-determination in ‘Magaya versus Magaya’, in: Harvard Human Rights Journal, 13, pp. 289-313.[11496]

Bull-Christiansen, Lene (2010): Versions of violence, Zimbabwe’s domestic violence law and symbolic politics of protection, in: Review of African Political Economy, vol. 37, 126, pp. 421-435.[11497]

Cheater, Angela (1982): Formal and informal rights to land in Zimbabwe’s black freehold areas: A case study from Msengezi, in: Africa, vol. 52, no. 3, pp. 77-91.[11498]

Chiganze, Felicitas (1987): Customary rules of inheritance and the Matrimonial Causes Act, A case for the Intestate succession Bill, Working Papers in Women’s Law, no. 9, Institute of Women’s Law, University of Oslo, Oslo.[11499]

Chigudu, Hope (2007): Deepening our understanding of community-based participatory research, Lessons from work around reproductive rights in Zimbabwe, in: Gender and Development, vol. 15, issue 2, pp. 259-270.[11500]

Chimanikire, Donald (2003): Women’s legal and socio-economic status in post-colonial Zimbabwe, A gender analysis, in: Zwede, Bahru (ed.): Land, gender and the periphery, Themes in the history of Eastern and Southern Africa, OSSREA Publications, Addis Ababa, pp. 67-80.[11501]

Dekker, Marleen / Hoogeveen, Hans (2002): Bride wealth and household security in rural Zimbabwe, in: Journal of African Economics, vol. 11, no. 1, pp. 114-145.[11502]

Dziva, Cowen (2013): The 2013 constitutional reform and the protection of women’s rights in Zimbabwe, in: Eastern African Social Science Reserach Review, vol. 34, no. 2, pp. 21-35.[11503]

Fortman, Louise (1996): Gendered knowledge: Rights and space in two Zimbabwean villages, Reflections on methods and findings, in: Rocheleau, Dianne / Thomas-Slayter, Barbara / Wangari, Esther (eds.): Feminist political ecology, Global issues and local experiences, Routlege Publications, London, pp. 211-223.[11504]

Gaidzanwa, Rudo (1995): Land and the economic empowerment of women: A gendered analyis, in: Southern African Feminist Review, vol. 1, no. 1, pp. 1-12.[11505]

Gaidzanwa, Rudo (1996): The ideology of domesticity and the struggles of women workers in Zimbabwe, in: Chachi, Amrita / Pittin, Renee (eds.): Confronting state, capital and patriarchy, Women organizing in the process of industrialization, St. Martin’s Press, New York, pp. 273-289.[11506]

Goebel, Allison (1999): „Here it is our land, the two of us“: Women, men and land in a Zimbabwean resettlement area, in: Journal of Contemporary African Studies, vol.17, no. 1, pp. 75-96.[11507]

Goebel, Allison (2005): Gender and land reform, The Zimbabwe experience, McGill-Queens University Press, Montreal.[11508]

Goebel, Allison (2005): Zimbabwe’s ‘fast track’ land reform, What about women, in: Gender, Place and Culture, vol. 12, no. 2, pp. 145-172.[11509]

Guni, Kelello Justina Mafoso (1990): The problem of baby dumping in Zimbabwe, Working Papers in Women’s Law, no. 26, Institute of Women’s Law, University of Oslo, Oslo.[11510]

Hellum, Anne (1992): Law’s forum, content and context: The case of changing and coexisting modes of regulation of human reproduction in Zimbabwe, Childless women’s perspectives, in: Adelman, S. / Paliwala, S.A. (eds.): Law, crisis and underdevelopment, London.[11511]

Hellum, Anne (1993): Gender and legal change in Zimbabwe, Childless women and divorce from a socio-cultural and historical perspective, in: Adelman, Samy / Paliwals, Abdul (eds.): Law and crisis in the third world, Hans Zell Publications, London, pp. 243-269.[11512]

Hellum, Anne (1993): Gender, law and democratisation: Reproductive regulation and legal pluralism in Zimbabwe, in: Ofstad, Arve (ed.): Development theory: Recent trends, Report of the Chr. Michelsen Institute, Bergen, pp. 155-173.[11513]

Hellum, Anne (1999): Women's human rights and legal pluralism in Africa: Mixed norms and identities in infertility management in Zimbabwe, Tano Aschehoug, Mond Books Oslo. [11514]

Hellum, Anne (2007): Paths are made for walking, Human rights intersecting plural legalism and gendered realities, Weaver Press, Harare.[11515]

Hellum, Anne / Derman, Bill (2004): Land reform and human right in contemporary Zimbabwe, Balancing individual and social justice through an integrated human rights framework, in: World Development, vol. 32, no. 10, pp. 1785-1805.[11516]

Hellum, Anne / Stewart, Julie (2007): Paths are made for walking, Human rights intersecting plural legalities and gendered realities, Weaver Press, Harare.[11517]

Hodgson, D.L. (2002): Women’s rights as human rights, Women in Law and Development in Africa, in: Africa Today, 49, 2, pp. 3-20.[11518]

Kazembe, Joyce / Mol, Marjon (1986): Zimbabwe – State, law and women, in: Schuler, Margaret (ed.): Empowerment and the law, Strategies of Third World Women, OEF Publications, Washington D.C., pp. 299-305.[11519]

Lueker, Lorna (2000): Males are not the only humans and biology is not destiny, Women and human rights in Zimbabwe, in: Scandianvian Journal of Development Alternatives and Area Studies, vol. 19, no. 2/3, pp. 31-45.[11520]

Maboreke, Mary (1991): Women and law in post-independence Zimbabwe, Experiences and lessons, in: Cock, Jacklyn (ed.): Putting women on the agenda, Ravan Press, Johannesburg, pp. 217-247.[11522]

Made, Pat (2000): A field of her own, Women and land rights in Zimbabwe, in: Mirsky, Judith / Radlett, Marty (eds.): No paradise yet, The world’s women face the new century, Zed Books, London.[11521]

Meekers, D. (1993): The noble custom of roora, The marriage practices of the Shona in Zimbabwe, in: Ethnology, vol. 32, no. 1, pp. 35-54.[11523]

Mildredtambudzai, Mushunje (2006): Challenges and opportunities for promoting the girl child’s rights in the face of HIV/AIDS, in: Gender and Development, vol. 14, no. 1, pp. 115-125.[11524]

Mvududu, Sara (1999): Reconceptualizing the legal position of women in Zimbabwe, in: ZIBFT (ed.): Indaba 1999, Women`s voices, Gender, books and development, Publications of the Zimbabwe International Book Fair Trust, Harare, pp. 204-215.[11525]

Ncube, Welshman (1998): Defending and protecting gender equality and the family under a decidedly undecided constitution in Zimbabwe, in: Eekelaar, John / Nhlapo, Thandabantu (eds.): The changing family – International perspectives on the family and family law, Hart Publishing, Oxford, pp. 509-528.[11526]

Ncube, Welshman / Steward, Julie et al. (1997): Continuity and change: The family in Zimbabwe, WLSA Publications, Harare.[11527]

Ncube, Welshman / Steward, Julie et al. (1998): Paradigms of exclusion: Women’s access to resources in Zimbabwe, WLSA Publications, Harare[11528]

Pankhurst, Donna / Jacobs, Susan (1988): Land tenure, gender relations and agricultural production: The case of Zimbabwe, in: Davison, Jean (ed.): Agriculture, women and land, Westview Press, Boulder, pp. 202-227.[11529]

Peters, Beverly (2000): The erosion of women’s rights and the political economy of customary law in Zimbabwe, in: South African Journal of International Affairs, vol. 7, no. 1, pp. 123-129.[11530]

Russie, Annalise (2000): Paths are made by walking, Die Frauen in Zimbabwe zwischen traditionellem und modernem Recht, in: Jong, Willemijn / Move, Illona / Roth, Claudia (eds.): Bilder und Realitäten der Geschlechter, Fallstudien zur Sozialanthropologie, Argonaut Verlag, Zürich, pp. 199-217.[11531]

Rutherford, Blair (1997): The power plays of identities on commercial farms in Zimbabwe, “law and gender” in Southern Africa revised, in: Anthropologica, vol. 39, no. 1/2, pp. 105-112.[11532]

Schmidt, Elizabeth (1990): Negotiated spaces and contexted terrain: Men, women and the law in colonial Zimbabwe, 1890-1939, in: Journal of Southern African Studies, vol. 16, no. 4, pp. 622-648.[11533]

Schmidt, Elizabeth (1992): Peasants, traders and wives - Shona women in the history of Zimbabwe, 1870-1939, London.[11534]

Schäfer, Rita (1999): Frauen-Rechtsorganisationen im südlichen Afrika - das Fallbeispiel Zimbabwe, in: Nord-Süd Aktuell, Jahrgang XIII, Nr. 2, pp. 301-311.[11536]

Schäfer, Rita (1998): Frauen, Landrechte und Ernährungssicherung in Zimbabwe, in: FIAN (Hg.): Sie säen, sie ernten, aber sie werden nicht satt - Frauen, Landrechte und Ernährungssicherung, Eigenverlag, Herne, pp. 22-31.[11537]

Steward, Julie (1998): Why I can’t teach customary law, in: Eekelaar, John / Nhlapo, Thandabantu (eds.): The changing family – International perspectives on the family and family law, Hart Publishing, Oxford, pp. 217-230.[11535]

Steward, Julie / Armstrong, Alice (1990): The legal situation of women in Southern Africa, Harare.[11538]

Tirnawo, Elizabeth (1990): Law as an instrument of social control, The case of Zimbabwe, Working Papers in Women’s Law, no. 19, Institute of Women’s Law, University of Oslo, Oslo.[11539]

Tsanga, Amy Shupikai / Stewart, Julie (eds.) (2011): Women and law, Innovative approaches to teaching, research and analysis, Weaver Press, Harare.[11542]

Tsanga, Shupikai Amy (1990): Women, law and culture, A case for the expansion of legal education in Zimbabwe, With particular emphasis on law reforms affecting women, Working Papers in Women’s Law, no. 18, Institute of Women’s Law, University of Oslo, Oslo.[11540]

Tsanga, Shupikai Amy (2001): Taking law to the people: Gender, law reform and community legal education in Zimbabwe, Weaver Press, Harare.[11541]

WLSA - WOMAN AND LAW IN SOUTHERN AFRICA RESEARCH TRUST (1991): A guide to maintenance law in Zimbabwe, WLSA-Publications, Harare.[11543]

WLSA - WOMAN AND LAW IN SOUTHERN AFRICA RESEARCH TRUST (1994): Changing families – Changing laws. Women and Law in Southern Africa Working Paper, no. 9, Harare.[11544]

WLSA - WOMAN AND LAW IN SOUTHERN AFRICA RESEARCH TRUST (1995): Parting the long grass, Revealing and reconceptualizing the African family, WLSA Publications, Harare.[11545]

WLSA - WOMAN AND LAW IN SOUTHERN AFRICA RESEARCH TRUST (1995): Towards a cultural understanding of the interplay between children`s and women`s rights, WLSA Publications, Harare.[11546]

WLSA - WOMAN AND LAW IN SOUTHERN AFRICA RESEARCH TRUST (1995): Beyond research: WLSA in action. Women and Law in Southern Africa, Working Paper, No. 10, Harare.[11547]

WLSA - WOMAN AND LAW IN SOUTHERN AFRICA RESEARCH TRUST (1996): Regional impact study report, Benaby Printing, Harare.[11548]

WLSA - WOMAN AND LAW IN SOUTHERN AFRICA RESEARCH TRUST (1997): Paving the wax forward: A review and research primer of WLSA research methodologies, WLSA Publications, Harare.[11549]

WLSA - WOMAN AND LAW IN SOUTHERN AFRICA RESEARCH TRUST (1997): Standing at the crossroads: WLSA and the rights dilemma, Which way can we go? WLSA Publications, Harare.[11550]

WLSA - WOMAN AND LAW IN SOUTHERN AFRICA RESEARCH TRUST (2000): In the shadow of the law, Women and justice delivery in Zimbabwe, WLSA Publications, Harare.[11551]

WLSA - WOMAN AND LAW IN SOUTHERN AFRICA RESEARCH TRUST (2001): Pregnancy and childbirth: Joy or despair? Women and gender-generated reproductive crimes of violence. Written by Julie Stewart & Ellen Sithole et al., WLSA Publications, Harare.[11552]

WLSA - WOMAN AND LAW IN SOUTHERN AFRICA RESEARCH TRUST (2001): A critical analysis of women’s access to land in the WLSA countries, Botswana, Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Swaziland, Zambia and Zimbabwe, WLSA Publication, Harare.[11553]

WLSA - WOMAN AND LAW IN SOUTHERN AFRICA RESEARCH TRUST (2001): Venia Magaya’s sacrifics, A case of custom gone away, WLSA publications, Harare/Blantyre.[11554]

WLSA - WOMAN AND LAW IN SOUTHERN AFRICA RESEARCH TRUST (2002): Lobola, Its implications for women’s reproductive rights in Botswana, Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Swaziland, Zambia and Zimbabwe, Weaver Press, Harare.[11555]

Zimbabwe Women’s Resource Centre and Network (ZWRCN) (1998): Beyond inequalities, Women in Zimbabwe, Publications of the ZWRCN and the SARDC, Harare.[11556]

Zimudzi, Tapiwa (2004): African women, violent crime and criminal law in colonial Zimbabwe, 1900-1952, in: Journal of Southern African Studies, vol. 30, no. 3, pp. 499-518.[11557]

society - families marriages

Adamchak, D.J. et al. (1991): Elderly support and intergenerational transfer in Zimbabwe, An analysis by gender, marital status and place of residence, in: The Gerontologist, vol. 31, no. 4, pp. 505-513.[8956]

Armstrong, Alice (1992): Struggling over scare resources - Women and maintenance in Southern Africa, SAFERE Publications, Harare.[8957]

Armstrong, Alice (1994): School and sadza, child custody in Zimbabwe, in: Journal of International Law and Family, vol. 8, pp. 151-170.[8958]

Armstrong, Alice / Himonga, Chuma (1993): Uncovering realtity: Excarvating women’s rights in African family law. WLSA Working Paper, No. 7, Harare.[8959]

Batisai, Kezia (2017): Pushing the limits of motherhood, Narratives of older women in rural Zimbabwe, in: African Studies, vol. 76, no. 1, pp. 44-63. [8960]

Bull-Christiansen, Lene (2013): ‘Respectable women’ versus ‘small houses’, Feminist negotiations of sexual morality, marriage and the challenge of HIV/AIDS in Zimbabwe, in: Journal of Southern African Studies, vol. 39, no. 3, pp. 511-526. [8961]

Debrabandere, Regina / Desmet, Arnout (1998): Brides have a price, Gender dimensions of objective oriented project planning in Zimbabwe, in: Guijt, Irene / Shah Kaul, Meena (eds.): The myths of community, Gender issues in participatory development, Intermediate Technology Publications, London, pp. 1000-109.[8962]

Dorsey, Betty (1989): Academic women at the university of Zimbabwe, Career prospects, Aspirations and family role constraints, in: Zimbabwe Journal of Educational Research, vol. 1, no. 3, pp. 342-376.[8963]

Folta, Jeanette / Deck, Edith (1987): Elderly black widows in rural Zimbabwe, in: Journal of Cross-Cultural Gerontology, vol. 2, pp. 321-342.[8964]

Folta, Jeanette / Deck, Edith (1988): The impact of children’s death on Shona mothers and families, in: Journal of Comparative Family Studies, vol. 19, no. 3, pp. 433-451.[8965]

Goebel, Allison (2002): ‘Men these days, they are the problem’, Husband-taming herbs and gender wars in rural Zimbabwe, in: Canadian Journal of African Studies, vol. 36, no. 3, pp. 460-489[8966]

Jackson, Cecile (2007): Resolving risk? Marriage and creative conjugality, in: Development and Change, vol. 38, no. 1, pp. 107-129.[8967]

Jackson, Helen (1992): Aids home care: A baseline survey in Zimbabwe, School of Social Work, Research Unit Series No. 3, Harare.[8968]

Jackson, Helen (1994): Family coping and Aids in Zimbabwe, School of Social Work, Research Unit Series No. 4, Harare.[8969]

Jacobs, Susan (1996): Structures and processes: Land, families, and gender relations, in: Gender and Development, vol. 4, no. 2, pp. 35-42.[8970]

Jeater, Diana (1993): Marriage, perversion, and power, The construction of moral discourse in Southern Rhodesia, 1894-1930, Claredon Press, Oxford.[8971]

Kirkwood, Deborah (1984): Settler wives in Southern Rhodesia: A case study, in: Ardener, Shirley / Callan, Hilary (eds.): The incorporated wife, Berg Publishers, Oxford, London, pp. 143-164.[8972]

Magaisa, Ishmael (2001): Prostitution, patriarchy, and marriage: A Zimbabwean case study, in: Rwomire, Apollo (ed.): African women and children, Crisis and response, Praeger Publishers, Westport, pp. 121-135.[8973]

Meekers, D. (1993): The noble custom of roora, The marriage practices of the Shona in Zimbabwe, in: Ethnology, vol. 32, no. 1, pp. 35-54.[8974]

Mhloyi, M. (1993): Perceptions on communication and sexuality in marriage in Zimbabwe, in: Women and Therapy, vol. 10, pp. 61-73.[8975]

Moss, Barbara A. (2002): Mai Chaza and the politics of motherhood in colonial Zimbabwe, in: Higgs, Catherine / Moss, Barbara / Ferguson, Earline (eds.): Stepping forward, Black women in Africa and the Americas, Ohio University Press, Athens, pp. 143-157.[8976]

Muzvidziwa, Victor (2001): Marriage as a survival strategy, The case of Masvingo, Zimbabwe, in: Zambesia, vol. 28, no. 2, pp. 147-165.[8977]

Muzvidziwa, Victor (2002): Heads of households or simply breadwinner? A case study of married women in Masvingo, Zimbabwe, in: Le Beau, Debie / Gordon, Robert (eds.): Challenges for anthropology in the ‘African renaissance’, A Southern African perspective, University of Namibia Press, Windhoek, pp. 163-176.[8978]

Ncube, Welshman (1998): Defending and protecting gender equality and the family under a decidedly undecided constitution in Zimbabwe, in: Eekelaar, John / Nhlapo, Thandabantu (eds.): The changing family – International perspectives on the family and family law, Hart Publishing, Oxford, pp. 509-528.[8979]

Osrim, Mary Johnson (1995): Trade, economy, and family in urban Zimbabwe, in: House-Midamba, Bessie / Ekechi, Felix (Hg.): African market women and economic power: The role of women in African economic development, Westport, pp. 157-176.[8980]

Paradza, Gamuchirai Gaynor (2009): Intergenerational struggles over urban housing, The impact on livelihoods of the elderly in Zimbabwe, in: Gender and Development, vol. 17, no. 3, pp. 417-426.[8981]

Rwezaura, Bart / Armstrong, Alice et al. (1995): Parting the long grass: Revealing and reconceptualising the African family, Women and Law in Southern Africa Research Trust, Working Paper no. 12, Harare.[8982]

Schmidt, Elizabeth (1990): Negotiated spaces and contexted terrain: Men, women and the law in colonial Zimbabwe, 1890-1939, in: Journal of Southern African Studies, vol. 16, no. 4, pp. 622-648.[8984]

Schmidt, Elizabeth (1992): Peasants, traders and wives - Shona women in the history of Zimbabwe, 1870-1939, London.[8985]

Schäfer, Rita (1997): Witwen in Zimbabwe - Begrenzungen von Handlungsmöglichkeiten und neue Überlebensstrategien, in: Bertels, Ursula / Eylert, Sabine (eds.): Familienformen im Kulturvergleich, Westfälisches Dampfboot, Münster 1997, pp. 183-190.[8983]

Shenje-Peyton, Angeline (1997): Balancing gender, equality, and cultural identity, Marriage payments in post-colonial Zimbabwe, in: Harvard Human Rights Journal, 9, pp. 107-144.[8986]

Summers, Carol (1999): Mission boys, civilized men and marriage, Educated African men in the missions of Southern Rhodesia, 1920-1945, in: Journal of Religious History, vol. 23, no. 1, pp. 75-91.[8987]

WLSA - Woman and Law in Southern Africa Research Trust (1994): Changing families – Changing laws. Women and Law in Southern Africa Working Paper, no. 9, Harare.[8988]

WLSA - Woman and Law in Southern Africa Research Trust (1995): Parting the long grass, Revealing and reconceptualizing the African family, WLSA Publications, Harare.[8989]

ZWRCN - Zimbabwe Women’s Resource Centre and Network (1994): Women and the family, ZWRCN Bibliographies, no. 16, Harare.[8990]

society - homosexuality / sexual minorities

Aarmo, Margarete (1999): How homosexuality became "un-african?"", The case of Zimbabwe, Blackwood E. / Wieringa S. E. (eds.): Female desires, Columbia University Press, New York, pp. 255-280.[9179]

Connor, Jonathan (2011): Development for whom? Homosexuality and faith-based development in Zimbabwe, in: Development in Practice, vol. 21, no. 6. pp. 860-869.[9180]

Epprecht, Marc (1999): The gay oral history project in Zimbabwe, Black empowerment, human rights and the research process, in: History in Africa, vol. 26, pp. 25-41.[9181]

Epprecht, Marc (2000): The ‘unsaying’ of homosexualities among indigenous black Zimbabweans, Mapping a blind spot in an African masculinity, in: Journal of Southern African Studies, vol. 24, pp. 631-651.[9182]

Epprecht, Marc (2004): Hungochani, The history of a dissident sexuality in Southern Africa, McGill-Queens University Press, Montreal.[9183]

Epprecht, Marc (2005): Black skin, “cowboy” masculinity: A genealogy of homophobia in the African nationalist movement in Zimbabwe to 1983, in: Culture, Health and Sexuality, special issue on African Sexualities, vol. 7, no. 3, pp. 253-266.[9184]

Melber, Henning (1995): Gays and lesbians in Zimbabwe, in: SAPEM, August, 1995, pp. 53-54.[9185]

Youde, Jeremy (2017): Patriotic history and anti-LGBT rhetoric in Zimbabwean politics, in: Canadian Journal of African Studies, vol. 51, no. 1, pp. 61-79.[9186]

society - masculinities

Burke, Timothy (1996): Lifeboy men, lux women - Commodification, consumption and cleanliness in modern Zimbabwe, Duke University Press, Lanham.[9489]

Epprecht, Marc (1999): The gay oral history project in Zimbabwe, Black empowerment, human rights and the research process, in: History in Africa, vol. 26, pp. 25-41.[9490]

Epprecht, Marc (2000): The ‘unsaying’ of homosexualities among indigenous black Zimbabweans, Mapping a blind spot in an African masculinity, in: Journal of Southern African Studies, vol. 24, pp. 631-651.[9491]

Goebel, Allison (1999): „Here it is our land, the two of us“: Women, men and land in a Zimbabwean resettlement area, in: Journal of Contemporary African Studies, vol.17, no. 1, pp. 75-96.[9492]

Goebel, Allison (2002): ‘Men these days, they are the problem’, Husband-taming herbs and gender wars in rural Zimbabwe, in: Canadian Journal of African Studies, vol. 36, no. 3, pp. 460-489.[9493]

Holland, Kathryn (2005): The troubled masculinities in Tsitsi Dangarembga’s Nervous Conditions, in: Ouzgane, Lahoucine / Morrell, Robert (eds.): African masculinities, Men in Africa from the nineteenth century to the present, Palgrave MacMillan, New York, pp. 121-136.[9494]

Mbizvo, M. / Adamchak, D. (1991): Family planning knowledge, attitudes and practices of men in Zimbabwe, in: Studies in Family Planning, vol. 22, pp. 31-38.[9495]

McCulloch, Jock (2000): Black peril, White virtue, Sexual crime in Southern Rhodesia, 1902-1935, Indiana University Press, Bloomington.[9496]

Pattman, Rob (1999): The beer drinkers say I had a nice prostitute but the church goers talk about things spiritual, Learning to be a man at the teachers’ college in Zimbabwe, in: Morrell, Robert (ed.): Changing men in Southern Africa, Zed Books, London, pp. 225-238.[9497]

Shire, Chenjerai (1994): Men don’t go to the moon, Language, space and masculinities in Zimbabwe, in: Cornwall, Andrea / Lindisfarne, Nancy (eds.): Dislocating masculinity - Comparative ethnographies, London, pp. 147-158.[9498]

Summers, Carol (1999): Mission boys, civilized men and marriage, Educated African men in the missions of Southern Rhodesia, 1920-1945, in: Journal of Religious History, vol. 23, no. 1, pp. 75-91.[9499]

society - migration and urbanisation

Barnes, Teresa (1992): The fight for control of African women’s mobility in colonial Zimbabwe, 1900-1939, in: Signs, Journal of Women in Culture and Society, vol. 17, pp. 586-608.[9824]

Barnes, Teresa (2002): Virgin territory? Travel and migration by African women in twentieth-century southern Africa, in: Allman, Jean / Geiger, Susan / Musisi, Nakanyike (eds.): Women in colonial African histories, Indiana University Press, Bloomington, pp. 164-190.[9825]

Crush, Jonathan /IDASA (2008): Gender, migration and remittances in Southern Africa, Institute for a Democratic Development in Southern Africa (IDASA), Cape Town.[9826]

Dodson, Belinda (2000): Women on the move, Gender and cross-border migration to South Africa from Lesotho, Mozambique and Zimbabwe, in: Mcdonald, David (ed.): On borders, Perspectives on international migration in Southern Africa, St. Martin`s Press, New York, pp. 119-150.[9827]

Drakakis-Smith, D.W. (1984): The changing economic role of women in the urbanization process: A preliminary report from Zimbabwe, in: International Migration Review, vol. 17/18, no. 4, pp. 1278-1292.[9828]

Grant, Miriam (1996): Moving and coping: Women tenants in Gweru, Zimbabwe, in: Sheldon, Kathleen (ed.): Courtyards, markets, city streets - Urban women in Africa, Boulder, Westview Press, pp. 169-189.[9829]

Grant, Miriam (2006): I have been patient enough, Gendered futures and mentors of female youth in urban Zimbabwe, in: Social Dynamics, 32, no. 1, pp. 21-46.[9830]

Gwebu, T.D. (2005): Gender and housing access, Experiences of low income groups in Bulawayo, Institute of Southern African Studies, Roma/Maseru.[9831]

Muzvidziwa, Victor (1997): Rural-urban linkages, Masvingo’s double-rooted female heads of households, in: Zambezia, vol. 24, no. 2, pp. 97-123.[9832]

Muzvidziwa, Victor (1999): Survival of urban women under ESAP in Masvingo, Zimbabwe, in: Review of Human Factor Studies, vol. 5, no. 1-2, pp. 115-129.[9833]

Muzvidziwa, Victor (2000): Accessing housing, constraints and coping strategies by female-headed households in Masvingo, Zimbabwe, in: Review of Southern African Studies, vol. 4, no. 1, pp. 64-93.[9834]

Muzvidziwa, Victor (2001): Marriage as a survival strategy, The case of Masvingo, Zimbabwe, in: Zambesia, vol. 28, no. 2, pp. 147-165.[9835]

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society - women's organisations

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